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Temporary Accommodation: Greater London

Communities and Local Government written question – answered on 27th June 2012.

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Photo of Karen Buck Karen Buck Shadow Minister (Education)

To ask the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government how many homeless households from each London borough were placed in temporary accommodation outside of their area at the end of each quarter in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12.

Photo of Grant Shapps Grant Shapps The Minister for Housing

holding answer 25 June 2012

A table has been placed in the Library of the House, showing the number of homeless households from each London borough placed in temporary accommodation in another local authority district at the end of each quarter in (a) 2008-09, (b) 2009-10, (c) 2010-11 and (d) 2011-12.

I would note that across this sample, based on the data returns, these figures show that average number of households housed outside their local authority area is lower under this Administration than the last.

You will be aware that the Localism Act 2011 contains a new power that will allow local authorities to use the private rented sector to house homeless families. This will mean shorter waiting times for homeless households and less time spent in temporary accommodation.

We are also consulting on strengthening accommodation rules, so that homeless households are placed nearer to home wherever possible. This is outlined in my Department's current consultation on the Homelessness (Suitability of Accommodation) (England) Order 2012.

Statistical releases on Statutory Homelessness are available both in the Library of the House and via the DCLG website:

http://www.communities.gov.uk/housing/housingresearch/housingstatistics/housingstatisticsby/homelessnessstatistics/publicationshomelessness/

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