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Immigrants: EU Nationals

Cabinet Office written question – answered on 12th December 2011.

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Photo of Priti Patel Priti Patel Conservative, Witham

To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office pursuant to the answer of 22 November 2011, Official Report, columns 333-4W, on immigrants: EU nationals, how many EU nationals whose original country of origin is outside the EU have settled in the UK in each of the last five years.

Photo of Nick Hurd Nick Hurd The Parliamentary Secretary, Cabinet Office, The Parliamentary Secretary, Cabinet Office

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the authority to reply.

Letter from Stephen Penneck, dated December 2011

As Director General for the Office for National Statistics, I have been asked to reply to your recent Parliamentary Question, pursuant to the Answer of 22 November 2011, Official Report, columns 333-4W, on immigrants: EU nationals, how many EU nationals whose country of origin is outside the EU have settled in the UK in each of the last five years (86328).

The Office for National Statistics produces estimates of long-term international migration, primarily based on the International Passenger Survey (IPS). The IPS is a continuous voluntary sample survey conducted by the Office for National Statistics. The latest figures available are for 2010 and these are shown in the following table. These latest estimates were published on 24 November 2011.

Long-term immigration to the UK of people who are EU citizens but whose country of last residence is not an EU state
Estimate SE%
2005 9,000 25
2006 7,000 29
2007 11,000 33
2008 9,000 23
2009 10,000 32
2010 7,000 21
Note: SE% = Standard error percentage Source: International Passenger Survey (IPS), ONS

Standard error percentages (SE%) indicate the robustness of each estimate. A migration figure with a standard error percentage greater than 25% is not considered to be reliable for practical purposes.

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