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Departmental Freedom of Information

Work and Pensions written question – answered on 8th November 2011.

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Photo of Jon Trickett Jon Trickett Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions in respect of how many responses to requests for information received by his Department under the Freedom of Information Act 2000 the reason of (a) commercially sensitive information, (b) information not held, (c) information too costly to provide and (d) vexatious or repeated requests has been given in response since January 2010.

Photo of Chris Grayling Chris Grayling The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

The Ministry of Justice publishes annual and quarterly reports containing statistical information on Freedom of Information requests received by monitored bodies, including central Government Departments.

The first two quarterly reports for 2011 can be found at the following address:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/statistics-and-data/foi/implementation-editions.htm

Annual and quarterly reports for 2010 and the annual statistics from 2005 can be found at the following address:.

http://www.justice.gov.uk/downloads/publications/statistics-and-data/mojstats/2010%20Annual%20and%20Q4% 20FOI%20bulletin%20vfinal.pdf

These reports include statistics on the number of non-routine requests received by DWP and the initial outcomes of these requests. It also contains the number of exemptions used for commercially sensitive information, information not held, too costly to provide and vexatious or repeated requests.

In addition, copies of each report have been placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

The quarter three statistics for 2011 are currently being collected and will be published in due course.

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