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Health: Reciprocal Agreements

House of Lords written question – answered on 20th July 2011.

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Photo of Lord Laird Lord Laird UUP

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 4 July (WA 10), why no payments were made to the United Kingdom in the last three years for European Union nationals resident in the United Kingdom for healthcare costs, and sickness and maternity benefits under EU regulations by Austria, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Iceland, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Poland, Slovakia and Slovenia, and by the Netherlands for the last two years; how much were any United Kingdom claims actually made to those countries; and what was the accumulated total paid to those countries by the United Kingdom over the past three years for the same costs.

To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 4 July (WA 10), whether there is a time limit on backdating payments to European Union countries making claims for healthcare and social security costs under European regulations for United Kingdom pensioners, dependants of pensioners, and for dependants of residents in those countries of their nationals working in the United Kingdom.

Photo of Earl Howe Earl Howe The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health

European Union (EU) Regulations 1408/71 and 574/72 have no time limits for introducing claims or paying those claims for healthcare benefits in kind. All claims and payments made up to and including the end of the financial year 2009-10 were in accordance with the regulations. Individual member states have been able to decide when to submit and pay claims. The United Kingdom submits claims for residents from other member states once the average costs for the relevant year have been published in the Official Journal of EU.

For treatment provided under Regulations 883/2004 and 987/2009, which succeeded 1408/71 and 574/72, there are time limits for the introduction and payment of claims.

Total average cost claims submitted by the UK to the countries referred to in the financial years 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10 are set out in Table 1. Over 95 per cent. of the claims were submitted in the year 2009-10. This corrects the earlier information I gave the noble Lord on 13 July, Official Report, col. (WA181).

The total amounts paid to those countries in the financial years 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-10 are set out in Table 2.

Table 1

EEA Medical Costs
UK Claims Submitted in 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-101 for Articles 94 and 952
Austria £703,000
Cyprus £0
Czech Republic £9,000
Iceland £0
Latvia £0
Liechtenstein £0
Lithuania £0
Luxembourg £0
Netherlands3 £3,431,000
Poland £15,000
Slovakia £0
Slovenia £0
Total £4,200,000

Notes:

1. Country totals are rounded to the nearest £1,000. Overall totals are rounded to the nearest £100,000. Sub-totals may not add up to totals due to rounding.

2. Pensioners, dependents of pensioners, and dependents of workers not resident in same member state as the worker.

3. Final value of UK claims as determined in accordance with the bilateral arrangement with Netherlands

Table 2

EEA Medical Costs
Total Payments to Member States 2007-08, 2008-09 and 2009-101
Payments for Article 94 and 95 Claims2 Payments To Member States £ Equivalent3
Austria £3,674,000
Cyprus £15,728,000
Czech Republic £107,000
Iceland £0
Latvia £32,000
Liechtenstein £0
Lithuania £9,000
Luxembourg £0
Netherlands £7,311,000
Poland £0
Slovakia £7,000
Slovenia £95,000
Total £27,000,000

Notes:

1. Country totals are rounded to the nearest £1,000. Overall totals are rounded to the nearest £100,000. Sub-totals may not add up to totals due to rounding.

2. Pensioners, dependents of pensioners, and dependents of workers not resident in same member state as the worker.

3. £ equivalent totals based on exchange rates at the time of the payment.

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