Only a few days to go: We’re raising £25,000 to keep TheyWorkForYou running and make sure people across the UK can hold their elected representatives to account.

Donate to our crowdfunder

Further Education: Learning Disability

Business, Innovation and Skills written question – answered on 3rd May 2011.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Tom Clarke Tom Clarke Labour, Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill

To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Innovation and Skills what discussions his Department has had with the (a) Young People's Learning Agency and (b) Skills Funding Agency on monitoring and assessing the quality of further education provision for people (i) with learning disabilities and (ii) with profound and multiple learning disabilities; and if he will make a statement.

Photo of John Hayes John Hayes The Minister for Universities and Science, The Minister of State, Department for Business, Innovation and Skills

The Young People's Learning Agency and Skills Funding Agency secure the provision of financial resources for education and training for learners above compulsory school age in further education colleges, training organisations, school sixth forms, and academies. Both agencies set conditions of funding, which include minimum levels of performance, assessments of financial health and control and satisfactory Ofsted inspection outcomes.

The arrangements for monitoring and assessing the quality of further education (FE) provision for learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities are the same as for other learners. Arrangements to meet the needs of learners, whatever they might be, mean that the specific requirements of learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities are considered and met.

In February 2011 the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills published a report entitled ‘National Learner Satisfaction Survey: FE Learners with Learning Difficulties and/or Disabilities’.

This report showed that learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities in FE express high levels of satisfaction with their learning experience, with 90% satisfied—this is comparable with other learners (91%). However, learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities are more likely to be extremely satisfied (21 compared with 18%). Three-quarters of learners with learning difficulties and/or disabilities (75%) would speak highly of their provider. They are significantly more likely than other learners to say they would do so without being asked (32 compared with 29%).

Does this answer the above question?

Yes1 person thinks so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.