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Schools: Drugs

Education written question – answered on 1st April 2011.

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Photo of Charles Walker Charles Walker Conservative, Broxbourne

To ask the Secretary of State for Education

(1) what educational materials, other than information produced by Frank, warning of the dangers attached to drug use his Department supplies to (a) primary and (b) secondary schools; and if he will make a statement;

(2) what methods his Department is using to deliver classroom-based drug prevention programmes in (a) primary and (b) secondary schools; and if he will make a statement.

Photo of Nick Gibb Nick Gibb Minister of State (Education)

holding answer 31 March 2011

All schools should teach pupils about the effects of drugs (including alcohol, tobacco, volatile substances and medicines) through the non-statutory framework for Personal, Social, Health and Economic education (PSHE) and as part of the statutory National Curriculum for Science. The Department's guidance, 'Drugs: Guidance for Schools (DfES 2004)', makes clear that drug education should start in primary schools and outlines the issues that should be covered in all key stages, having regard to the age and maturity of the pupils concerned. As part of their drug education, pupils should learn how to make informed choices about their health, how to resist pressure to do wrong and to take more responsibility for their actions. The guidance is available at:

www.education.gov.uk/publications

We are committed to giving schools greater freedoms and flexibility, so we leave it to them to decide how they teach these basic requirements and what resources they use to support their teaching. For this reason, we do not promote, endorse or supply any educational materials to be used. We believe it is important that schools have the flexibility to use their professional judgment in such matters so that they can take account of the views of parents and the needs of pupils, as well as of the ethos of the school.

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