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Sudan

House of Lords written question – answered on 3rd February 2011.

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Photo of The Earl of Sandwich The Earl of Sandwich Crossbench

To ask Her Majesty's Government what proportion of their bilateral aid to south Sudan since 2006 has directly supported the civil service.

Photo of Baroness Verma Baroness Verma Lords Spokesperson (Home Office) (Equalities and Women's Issues), Baroness in Waiting (HM Household) (Whip), Lords Spokesperson (Department for International Development)

As reported in Statistics on International Development, between 2006 and 2010 over 30 per cent of UK bilateral aid to Sudan has been spent on government and civil society, which includes support to the civil service. Currently Southern Sudan receives just over half of all UK bilateral aid to Sudan.

We have supported the development of a civil service in Southern Sudan in a number of ways. The UK is a key partner in the multi-donor Capacity Building Trust Fund (CBTF). Following the Comprehensive Peace Agreement in 2005, the CBTF helped to create the civil service and establish accountable local government through, for example, the development of a verified payroll for the Ministry of Education both at central and state level and training over 500 staff in financial and procurement management. Six years on and the CBTF recently enabled the registration of a certified examination centre for international accounting and procurement courses, where 104 Southern Sudanese officials sat for the first exams in December 2010. Another UK-funded project, support to effective and democratic governance in Southern Sudan, has trained 20,300 civil servants in the public service curriculum.

Future support to Sudan will be determined under the bilateral aid review.

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