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Community Orders: Reoffenders

Justice written question – answered on 18th January 2011.

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Photo of Kelvin Hopkins Kelvin Hopkins Labour, Luton North

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many offenders carrying out unpaid work under community orders were sent back to prison following breaches of the conditions of their order in 2009-10.

Photo of Crispin Blunt Crispin Blunt Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Ministry of Justice) (Prisons and Probation)

The information requested is not held centrally and could be obtained only at disproportionate cost. Although statistics are collected on the number of unpaid work requirements which fail to complete and on the number of prison receptions for breach of a community order or suspended sentence order, the two data sets are separate and it would require a time-consuming data-matching exercise to combine them and calculate the number of receptions into custody which were specifically related to breach of an order with an unpaid work requirement.

In 2009-10 23,251 unpaid work requirements attached to community orders and suspended sentence orders were revoked for failure to comply or for conviction of a further offence.

Data published for the calendar year 2009 show that 3,996 persons were received into prison establishments in England and Wales for breach of a community sentence and 4,361 for breach of a suspended sentence(1).

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

(1) Source:

Table 6.9, Offender Management Caseload Statistics 2009, Ministry of Justice

http://www.justice.gov.uk/publications/prisonandprobation.htm

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