Means-tested Benefits

Work and Pensions written question – answered on 30th March 2010.

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Photo of Frank Field Frank Field Labour, Birkenhead

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many persons with a national insurance number who are (a) 21 or under and (b) over 21 years old claim all means-tested benefits.

Photo of Jim Knight Jim Knight Minister of State (the South West), Regional Affairs, Minister of State (the South West), Department for Work and Pensions, Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (South West), The Minister of State, Department for Work and Pensions

All claimants are required to have, or have applied for a national insurance number (NINO) when they claim benefits; however, possession of a NINO does not in and of itself confer any rights to benefits on its holder. The most recent available information is in the following tables.

Income support (IS) and income-based jobseeker's allowance (JSA (IB)) claimants by age, Great Britain, August 2009
All ages Aged 21 years and under Aged over 21 years
IS 1,955,330 145,310 1,810,010
JSA (IB) 1,055,700 262,000 793,700
Notes:

1. Figures for JSA (IB) have been uprated using 5 per cent. proportions against 100 per cent. WPLS totals and rounded to the nearest 100.

2. Figures for IS are taken from 100 per cent. data and rounded to the nearest 10.

3. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

4. JSA (IB) benefit type: The benefit type is defined as pay status at the case load date-this may differ to the status at the start or end of the claim.

5. JSA (IB) includes a small number of claimants with both contributory-based and income-based entitlement.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study (WPLS) Information Directorate, 100 per cent., 5 per cent. samples.

Employment and support allowance (income-based) claimants by age, Great Britain, August 2009
All ages Aged 21 years and under Aged over 21 years
Number 190,380 29,840 160,540
Notes:

1. Case load figures are rounded to the nearest 10; some additional disclosure control has also been applied.

2. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

3. Employment and support allowance (ESA) replaced incapacity benefit and income support paid on the grounds of incapacity for new claims from 27 October 2008.

4. ESA, income-based benefit type: The benefit type is defined as pay status at the case load date-this may differ to the status at the start or end of the claim.

5. Income-based ESA includes a small number of claimants with both contributory-based and income-based entitlement.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study (WPLS).

Pension credit claimants, Great Britain, August 2009
Number
Total 2,737,290
Notes:

1. Case load figures are rounded to the nearest 10; some additional disclosure control has also been applied.

2. Pension credit was introduced on 6 October 2003 and replaced minimum income guarantee (income support for people aged 60 or over). The vast majority of people who were previously in receipt of the minimum income guarantee transferred to pension credit in October 2003. These pension credit statistics are produced on a different basis to the early estimates. The latter are more timely but operational processing times mean that a number of claim commencements and terminations are not reflected in them.

3. This data represents all claimants as this benefit is not paid to anyone aged under 60.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study (WPLS).

Housing benefit and council tax benefit claimants by age, Great Britain, November 2009
All ages Aged 21 years and under Aged over 21 years
Housing benefit 4,579,180 184,370 4,394,520
Council tax benefit 5,600,830 137,200 5,463,300
Notes:

1. The figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.

2. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

3. The data refers to benefit units, which may be a single person or a couple.

4. Council tax benefit figures exclude any single adult rebate cases.

5. SHBE is a monthly electronic scan of claimant level data direct from local authority computer systems. It replaces quarterly aggregate clerical returns. The data is available monthly from November 2008 and November 2009 is the most recent available.

6. There will be overlaps in data between housing benefit (HB) and council tax benefit (CTB) and between HB/CTB and the other benefits shown in the preceding tables.

Source:

Single Housing Benefit Extract (SHBE).

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