Council Tax Benefits and Housing Benefit

Work and Pensions written question – answered on 30th March 2010.

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Photo of Grant Shapps Grant Shapps Shadow Minister (Communities and Local Government) (Housing and Planning), Co-Chair, Conservative Party

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions what the average weekly payment of (a) council tax benefit and (b) housing benefit was to a (i) private renter and (ii) social tenant in each year since 1997.

Photo of Helen Goodman Helen Goodman Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions)

The available information is in the tables.

Council tax benefit figures are not available by tenancy type.

Council tax benefit recipients average weekly amount : Great Britain
Month (£)
1997 May 7.30
1998 May 8.20
1999 May 8.80
2000 May 9.40
2001 May 10.10
2002 May 10.80
2003 May 12.13
2004 May 13.12
2005 May 13.58
2006 May 14.13
2007 May 14.62
Notes:

1. Recipients are as at second Thursday of the month.

2. Average awards are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest penny.

So urce:

Housing benefit and council tax benefit management information system

Quarterly 100 per cent. taken in August 2007

Council tax benefit recipients average weekly amount: November 2008 and October 2009: Great Britain
Month £
2008 December 15.10
2009 December 15.76
Notes:

1. Recipients are as at second Thursday of the month.

2. Average awards are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest penny.

3. Inaugural SHBE data was extracted at November 2008.

4. October 2009 represents the latest data held.

Source:

Single Housing Benefit Extract (SHBE).

All housing benefit recipients average weekly amounts by tenure May 1997 to May 2007: Great Britain
Month Social tenant (£) Private tenant (£)
1997 May 38.90 57.95
1998 May 40.33 58.83
1999 May 42.64 60.11
2000 May 44.94 61.51
2001 May 47.97 64.36
2002 May 51.41 68.63
2003 May 52.11 71.53
2004 May 55.78 76.23
2005 May 58.70 81.71
2006 May 61.81 85.09
2007 May 65.38 88.91
Notes:

1. The data refers to benefit units, which may be a single person or a couple.

2. Average amounts are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest

penny.

3. Social tenants comprise Local authority and Registered Social Landlord (RSL) tenants.

4. Private tenants include regulated and deregulated tenants.

Source:

Housing benefit and council tax benefit management information system aggregate quarterly 100 per cent. taken in May in each year shown.

Data for December 2008 and December 2009 are derived from the new Single Housing Benefit Extract (SHBE) which is a monthly electronic scan of claimant level data direct from local authority computer systems, whereas earlier years are derived from quarterly aggregate clerical returns. Figures from the two sources may not be directly comparable; the introduction of SHBE has improved the accuracy of HB/CTB statistics as it based on individual claimant records rather than summary statistics, has a higher completion rate from local authorities leading to less estimation of missing data, and is subject to more thorough quality assurance.

All housing benefit recipients average weekly amounts by tenure December 2008 and December 2009: Great Britain.
Month Social tenant (£) Private tenant (£)
2008 December 68.61 100.96
2009 December 72.42 105.89
Notes:

1. The data refers to benefit units, which may be a single person or a couple.

2. Average awards are shown as pounds per week and rounded to the nearest penny.

3. SHBE is a monthly electronic scan of claimant level data direct from local authority computer systems. It replaces quarterly aggregate clerical returns.

4. Inaugural SHBE data was extracted at November 2008.

5. October 2009 represents the latest data held.

6. Social tenants comprise Local authority and Registered Social Landlord (RSL) tenants.

7. Private tenants include regulated and deregulated tenants.

Source:

Single housing benefit extract 100 per cent. individual level data (SHBE).

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