Hunting Act 2004: Prosecutions

Justice written question – answered on 4th February 2010.

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Photo of Elliot Morley Elliot Morley Labour, Scunthorpe

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) prosecutions, (b) convictions and (c) cautions there were in 2008 for offences under the Hunting Act 2004.

Photo of Claire Ward Claire Ward Parliamentary Under-Secretary, Ministry of Justice

The number of offenders cautioned, and the number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates courts and found guilty at all courts in England and Wales for offences under the Hunting Act 2004, in 2008 can be viewed in the following table.

The number of offenders cautioned( 1,2) and the number of defendants proceeded against at magistrates' courts and found guilty at all courts for offences under the Hunting Act 2004( 3) , England and Wales, 2008( 4,5)
Number
Cautioned 4
Proceeded against 44
Found guilty 33
(1) The cautions statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been cautioned for two or more offences at the same time the principal offence is the more serious offence.

(2) From 1 June 2000 the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 came into force nationally and removed the use of cautions for persons under 18 and replaced them with reprimands and final warnings. These figures have been included in the totals.

(3) Came into force on 18 February 2005.

(4) The court proceedings statistics relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences the principal offence is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(5) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source:

Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

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