Crimes of Violence: Detection Rates

Home Department written question – answered on 22nd October 2008.

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Photo of Dominic Grieve Dominic Grieve Shadow Secretary of State (Home Office), Shadow Attorney General

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the violent crime detection rate in England and Wales was in each of the last 10 years.

Photo of Jacqui Smith Jacqui Smith Home Secretary

holding answer 6 October 2008

A number of changes have been made to recorded crime in response to the two reviews of crime statistics. One such change is that the term 'violent crime' is no longer used in connection with the recorded crime statistics and we now provide figures for violence against the person.

Non-sanction detections that contribute to the detection rates have fallen in recent years reflecting a significant shift by many forces away from recording detections of crime where no further action is taken. For this reason, overall detection rates over time are not fully comparable. From April 2007, the rules governing recording of non-sanction detections were revised to reduce the scope within which they can be claimed to a very limited set of circumstances.

Detection rates for violence against the person offences in England and Wales, from 1998-99 to 2007-08, are given in the tables.

Table 1: Detection rates for violence against the person offences in England and Wales, from 1998-99 to 2001 - 02
Detection rate (Percentage)
1998-99 71
1999-2000 65
2000-01 62
2001-02 58
Note:

Figures in this table were prior to the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. Figures before and after that date are not directly comparable.

Table 2: Detection rates for violence against the person offences in England and Wales, from 2002-03 to 2007-08
Detection rate (Percentage)
2002-03 54
2003-04 50
2004-05 53
2005-06 54
2006-07 51
2007-08 49
Notes:

1. Figures in this table are after the introduction of the National Crime Recording Standard in April 2002. Figures before and after that date are not directly comparable.

2. Includes the British Transport police from 2002-03 onwards.

3. It should be noted that non-sanction detections that contribute to the detection rates have fallen in recent years reflecting a significant shift by many police forces away from recording detections of crime where no further action is taken. For this reason, overall detection rates over time are not fully comparable. From 1 April 2007, the rules governing recording of non-sanction detections were revised to reduce the scope within which they can be claimed to a very limited set of circumstances.

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