Incapacity Benefit

Work and Pensions written question – answered on 30th April 2008.

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Photo of Danny Alexander Danny Alexander Liberal Democrat, Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey

To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions how many and what proportion of incapacity benefit claimants received the benefit for (a) back pain and (b) repetitive strain injuries in each year since 1980; and if he will make a statement.

Photo of Anne McGuire Anne McGuire The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Work and Pensions

The diagnosed condition does not of itself confer entitlement to incapacity benefits. Entitlement is dependent upon the medical assessment of incapacity for work, the personal capability assessment, which assesses how a person's condition affects their mental or physical functions.

Information is not available prior to 1995. The available information is in the following table.

Number and proportion of incapacity benefit/severe disablement allowance claimants with a primary diagnosis of back pain or repetitive strain injury
Back pain Repetitive strain injury
As at May each year Number Percentage Number Percentage
1995 321,100 11.3 100 0.0
1996 339,400 11.9 700 0.0
1997 347,300 12.2 700 0.0
1998 342,100 12.3 700 0.0
1999 336,900 12.3 800 0.0
2000 334,770 12.3 930 0.0
2001 339,950 12.2 1,000 0.0
2002 335,670 12.0 970 0.0
2003 330,030 11.7 950 0.0
2004 321,700 11.4 910 0.0
2005 309,900 11.1 870 0.0
2006 296,270 10.9 800 0.0
2007 282,970 10.5 760 0.0
Notes:

1. May 1995 to May 1999 (inclusive) numbers have been based on five per cent. sample figures uprated to 100 per cent WPLS totals.

2. May 2000 to May 2007 (inclusive) numbers are based on 100 per cent. WPLS figures.

3. Totals may not sum due to rounding.

4. May 1995 to May 1999 (inclusive) numbers are based on a five per cent. sample, and are therefore subject to a degree of sampling variation. These figures should be used as a guide to the current situation only.

5. Causes of incapacity are based on the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, published by the World Health Organisation.

6. Proportions are rounded to one decimal place.

Source:

DWP Information Directorate five per cent sample and 100 per cent Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study

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