Custodial Treatment: Young People

Justice written question – answered on 30th April 2008.

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Photo of Jennifer Willott Jennifer Willott Opposition Deputy Chief Whip (Commons)

To ask the Secretary of State for Justice how many (a) juvenile and (b) young adult offenders were placed in custody for a breach of a community order in each of the last five years; and if he will make a statement.

Photo of David Hanson David Hanson The Minister of State, Ministry of Justice

The following table gives the numbers of juveniles (aged under 18) and young adults (aged 18 to 20) received into all prison establishments in England and Wales for breach of all community sentences between 2002 and 2006, the latest year for which figures are available:

Under 18s Age 18-20
2002 187 428
2003 242 555
2004 365 621
2005 404 695
2006 448 911

It is not possible to separately identify those received into prison for breach of a specific community sentence such as a community order.

Since 2001-02 the National Probation Service has achieved marked improvements in enforcement. The target is to take breach action within 10 working days of a second unacceptable failure to comply with an order (or third unacceptable failure to comply with a licence) in 90 per cent. of cases. The improvements are shown in the table as follows:

Enforcement (target = 90 per cent.)
Community Orders Licences Total
2001-02 52 58 53
2002-03 64 63 64
2003-04 77 79 77
2004-05 87 85 87
2005-06 91 93 91
2006-07 92 94 92
2007-08 (April to December) 94 96 94

Over the same period, compliance levels have also increased (where compliance is defined as the proportion of orders and licences reaching the six months stage without requiring breach action), as shown.

Compliance
Community Orders Licences Total
2001-02 55 87 60
2002-03 55 88 62
2003-04 56 89 62
2004-05 59 92 66
2005-06 65 92 70
2006-07 67 91 72
2007-08 (April to December) 67 91 71

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

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