NHS: Consultants

Health written question – answered on 1st April 2008.

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Photo of David Drew David Drew Labour, Stroud

To ask the Secretary of State for Health how many finished consultant episodes there were at (a) Gloucestershire Royal Hospital and (b) Cheltenham General Hospital in each year since 1992.

Photo of Ben Bradshaw Ben Bradshaw Minister of State (Regional Affairs) (South West), The Minister of State, Department of Health

Information is not held in the format requested. Information is collected about finished consultant episodes (FCEs) at national health service trust level, rather than individual hospital level. Gloucestershire Royal hospital and Cheltenham general hospital are part of Gloucestershire hospitals NHS foundation trust.

The following table shows numbers of FCEs at Gloucestershire hospitals NHS foundation trust for 2002-03 to 2006-07. Prior to 2002-03, there were a number of complex trust mergers, meaning that the data are too inconsistent to use.

FCEs at Gloucestershire hospitals NHS foundation trust for 2002-03 to 2006-07, NHS hospitals in England and activity performed in the independent sector in England commissioned by English NHS
Year (of end of period of care in patient's hospital stay) FCEs
2006-07 160,627
2005-06 158,911
2004-05 146,768
2003-04 140,017
2002-03 137,570
Notes: 1. A FCE is defined as a period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one health care provider. The figures do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the year. 2. Assessing growth through time. HES figures are available from 1989-90 onwards. During the years that these records have been collected by the NHS there have been ongoing improvements in quality and coverage. These improvements in information submitted by the NHS have been particularly marked in the earlier years and need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. Changes in NHS practice also need to be borne in mind when analysing time series. For example, a number of procedures may now be undertaken in out-patient settings and may no longer be accounted in the HES data. This may account for any reductions in activity over time. 3. Data Quality. HES are compiled from data sent by over 300 NHS trusts and primary care trusts in England. The Information Centre for health and social care liaises closely with these organisations to encourage submission of complete and valid data and seeks to minimise inaccuracies and the effect of missing and invalid data via HES processes. While this brings about improvement over time, some shortcomings remain. 4. Ungrossed Data. Figures have not been adjusted for shortfalls in data (i.e. the data are ungrossed). Source: Hospital Episode Statistics (HES), The Information Centre for health and social care.

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