Death Rates (Bexley)

Treasury written question – answered on 23rd October 2006.

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Photo of David Evennett David Evennett Opposition Whip (Commons)

To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer what the average length of life is for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley; and what it was in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2001 in each case.

Photo of John Healey John Healey The Financial Secretary to the Treasury

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the National Statistician who has been asked to reply.

Letter from Karen Dunnell, dated 23 October 2006:

As National Statistician, I have been asked to reply to your recent question asking what the average length of life is for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley, and what it was in (i) 1997 and (ii) 2001 in each case. (96233)

Life expectancy figures are calculated as three year rolling averages. The attached table provides the period life expectancy at birth for (a) men and (b) women in the London borough of Bexley, in (i) 1996-98, (ii) 2000-02, and (iii) 2002-04 (the latest period available).

Table 1: Period life expectancy at birth( 1) , London borough of Bexley( 2) , 1996-98, 2000-02 and 2002-043
Years of life
Male Female
Year( 3) Life expectancy 95 per cent. confidence interval( 4) Life expectancy 95 per cent. confidence interval( 4)
1996-98 75.9 75.4 76.3 80.4 80.0 80.8
2000-02 77.0 76.6 77.5 81.2 80.8 81.6
2002-04 77.6 77.2 78.1 81.5 81.1 81.9
(1 )Period life expectancy at birth is an estimate of the average number of years a newborn baby would survive or she experienced the area's age-specific mortality rates for that time period throughout his or her life. The figure reflects mortality among those living in the area in each time period rather than mortality among those born in each area. It is not therefore the number of years a baby born in the area in each time period could actually expect to live, both because the death rates of the area are likely to change in the future and because many of those born in the area will live elsewhere for at least some part of their lives.

(2 )Using local authority boundaries as of 2005 for all the years shown.

(3) Three year rolling averages, based on deaths registered in each year and mid-year population.

(4 )Confidence intervals are a measure of the statistical precision of an estimate and show the range of uncertainty around the estimated figure. Calculations based on small numbers of events are often subject to random fluctuations. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.

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