Mixed Year Groups

Education and Skills written question – answered on 16th October 2006.

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Photo of Graham Stuart Graham Stuart Conservative, Beverley and Holderness

To ask the Secretary of State for Education and Skills

(1) how many mixed year groups there were in schools in (a) the East Riding of Yorkshire local education authority area and (b) in England in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement;

(2) how many mixed year group classes there were in schools in (a) the East Riding of Yorkshire local education authority area and (b) in England in each year since 1997; and if he will make a statement.

Photo of Jim Knight Jim Knight Minister of State (Schools and 14-19 Learners), Department for Education and Skills, Minister of State (Education and Skills) (Schools and 14-19 Learners)

The available information is shown in the table.

Maintained primary and secondary schools: number of mixed year group classes and pupils in them( 1,2 ) 2003 to 2006, position in January each year
East Riding of Yorkshire local authority area England
Maintained primary Maintained secondary Maintained primary Maintained secondary
Classes Pupils Classes Pupils Classes Pupils Classes Pupils
2003 336 8,640 1 4 35,162 894,411 608 7,111
2004 356 9,045 2 9 34,906 889,699 646 7,937
2005 307 7,810 3 18 33,979 863,761 836 11,133
2006 310 7,864 2 7 32,398 824,718 726 9,552
(1) One teacher classes.

(2 )Classes as taught during a single selected period on the day of the census in January each year.

Source: Schools Census

Comparable information on mixed year group classes is not available prior to 2003 due to a change in the underlying data collection method.

It is up to schools to decide for themselves how best to meet their pupils' educational needs. Whether classes are organised in age groupings or in mixed age settings, it is important that teaching and learning is delivered at an appropriate level for the child.

The DfES published guidance last month to help teachers formulate the most appropriate grouping strategies for the pupils. It sets out the advantages and disadvantages of different pupil grouping methods to help teachers choose which strategy will suit them best. We will continue, through the National Strategies and our Gifted and Talented programme, to offer practical advice and guidance to schools on classroom practice so that they can make decisions about how to use pupil setting and grouping intelligently as part of their overall approach to tailoring learning to meet the needs of all their pupils.

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