Appointments

Constitutional Affairs written question – answered on 24th February 2005.

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Photo of Paddy Tipping Paddy Tipping Labour, Sherwood

To ask the Parliamentary Secretary, Department for Constitutional Affairs pursuant to his Answer of 9 February to Question reference 215189, if he will break down the figures provided in tables 1A, 1B and 2 by gender.

Photo of David Lammy David Lammy Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Constitutional Affairs)

The breakdown of the figures provided in the answer on 9 February 2005, Hansard, column 1609W (and in my pursuant answer yesterday) are detailed in the following tables.

Tables 1A and 1B show full-time appointments for the calendar years 1975–97. The figures include appointments of Judicial officers to full time Tribunal posts for Tribunals administered by DCA (formerly Lord Chancellor's Department) but exclude those administered by other Government Departments (such as the Employment Tribunal and The Appeal Service and its pre 1999 predecessor The Independent Tribunal Service). These tables also include lay magistrates appointments from 1990 onwards.

Figures for the appointment and the gender split of part time judicial officers between 1975 and 1997, and for lay magistrates prior to 1990 is not given, as DCA does not hold complete figures on the appointment and gender of these judicial officers who were appointed during these periods, and those that exist could only be determined at disproportionate cost.

The gender split for full-time and part-time judicial officer appointments for each year between 1998–2004 is set out in tables 2A-D. These figures are obtained from the Judicial Appointments Annual Reports to Parliament for each of the financial years from 1998–2004.

It is also necessary to mention that while every care has been taken, the figures supplied for the years 1975–98 may not be wholly complete as they are drawn from very old records. For some of the very early appointments, the DCA have only a surname and initials thus it is not absolutely certain what the gender was, and in these cases, on the basis that there were very few women in the judiciary that long ago, it has been assumed that they are men.

Table 1A: 1975–84 full-time appointments
Male Female Total
1975–97 full-time appointments gender split
1975 44 1 45
1976 45 1 46
1977 41 2 43
1978 54 3 57
1979 36 3 39
1980 62 3 65
1981 39 2 41
1982 50 3 53
1983 47 1 48
1984 61 1 62
Table 1B: 1985–94 full-time and lay magistrates appointments
Male Female Total
1985 50 3 53
1986 78 4 82
1987 52 2 54
1988 59 1 60
1989 49 5 54
1990 49 6 55
1991 85 7 92
1992 105 15 120
1993 112 15 127
1994 76 15 91
1995 93 17 110
1996 91 9 100
1997 55 11 66
Lay magistrates
1985 n/a n/a
1986 n/a n/a
1987 n/a n/a
1988 n/a n/a
1989 n/a n/a
1990 996 1,063 2,059
1991 1,008 1,009 2,017
1992 1,080 990 2,070
1993 1,045 1,017 2,062
1994 810 783 1,593
1995 907 936 1,843
1996 830 852 1,682
1997 764 809 1,573
Tables 2A-D 1998–99 to 2003–04 full-time, part-time (fee paid) and lay magistrates appointments
1998–99 1999–2000 2000–01 2001–02 2002–03 2003–04
Table 2A: full-time appointments gender split
Male 118 74 155 94 125 95
Female 30 21 43 31 31 31
Total 148 95 198 125 156 126
Table 2B: part-time appointments gender split
Male 367 264 390 507 358 227
Female 119 105 165 283 183 127
Total 486 369 555 790 541 354
Table 2C: Lord Chancellor lay magistrates appointments (excluding Duchy of Lancaster)
Male 654 692 703 763 714 777
Female 624 731 663 711 696 701
Total 1,278 1,423 1,366 1,474 1,410 1,478
Table 2D: lay magistrates appointments in the Duchy of Lancaster
Male n/a n/a 132 164 124 152
Female n/a n/a 120 148 89 128
Total 252 312 213 280

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