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Study Visas

Home Department written question – answered on 29th April 2004.

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Photo of Hugh Bayley Hugh Bayley NATO Parliamentary Assembly UK Delegation

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people (a) in total, (b) from Africa and (c) from each country in Africa are in possession of a visa to study in the UK.

Photo of Des Browne Des Browne Minister of State (Citizenship, Immigration and Counter-Terrorism), Home Office, Minister of State (Home Office) (Citizenship, Immigration and Nationality)

The information requested is not available.

The tables show the available statistics for students given leave to enter the United Kingdom or granted an extension of leave to remain, 1998 to 2002. These will include students who have subsequently left the country.

Data on passengers given leave to enter the United Kingdom and persons granted an extension of leave to remain in previous years are published in the Command Papers "Control of Immigration: Statistics United Kingdom" obtainable from the House Library, the Stationery Office and via the Home Office website http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/rds/hobpubs1.html.

Table 1: Passengers given leave to enter the United Kingdom as students(96), excluding EEA nationals, 1998 to 2002—United Kingdom -- Number of journeys
Geographical region

and nationality

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Africa(97)
Algeria 530 410 520 930 670
Angola 250 250 190 270 355
Congo (Dem. Rep.)(98) 50 50 40 30 20
Egypt 1,190 1,050 1,100 1,210 920
Ethiopia 190 190 180 240 155
Ghana 970 1,320 1,800 2,460 2,890
Kenya 1,580 1,590 1,670 1,920 1,980
Libya 1,080 1,140 1,730 2,670 3,130
Mauritius 690 820 950 1,180 1,210
Morocco 650 700 660 530 535
Nigeria 1,660 2,070 2,430 3,220 4,320
Sierra Leone 100 130 190 280 355
Somalia 20 40 30 95 40
South Africa 860 1,050 1,180 1,300 1,380
Sudan 330 320 390 310 455
Tanzania 1,070 940 950 910 905
Tunisia 610 970 840 980 910
Uganda 580 670 800 990 1,290
Zambia 500 560 580 700 680
Zimbabwe 690 770 1,070 1,700 1,780
Other Africa 2,790 2,880 3,000 3,250 3,640
Africa 16,400 17,900 20,300 25,200 27,600
All nationalities(97)

(excluding EEA)

266,000 272,000 313,000 339,000 369,000

(96) The data are of the number of journeys made; a person who makes more than one journey is counted on each occasion if given fresh leave

(97) Includes visa and non-visa nationals.

(98) The Democratic Republic of the Congo, formerly known as Zaire.

Note:

Data rounded to three significant digits.

Table 2: Grants of extensions of leave to remain in the United Kingdom as students1,2, excluding EEA nationals, 1998 to 2002—United Kingdom -- Number of decisions
Geographical region

and nationality

1998 1999 2000 2001 2002
Africa(101)
Algeria 130 120 140 250 245
Angola 70 90 100 80 155
Congo (Dem. Rep.)(102) 20 20 20 30 30
Egypt 120 150 270 265 295
Ethiopia 50 60 60 50 80
Ghana 680 950 1,420 1,965 3,130
Kenya 950 1,030 1,080 1,010 1,315
Libya 720 340 690 855 1,260
Mauritius 740 780 860 890 1,280
Morocco 100 90 120 150 150
Nigeria 1,680 1,780 2,080 2,170 2,840
Sierra Leone 270 240 260 210 275
Somalia (103) (103) 10 10 5
South Africa 340 590 1,250 1,715 2,250
Sudan 150 170 170 165 200
Tanzania 570 780 920 815 1,170
Tunisia 20 30 30 30 40
Uganda 280 380 570 680 930
Zambia 520 670 830 695 640
Zimbabwe 1,350 3,320 5,070 5,810 9,075
Other Africa 1,270 1,570 2,010 2,200 3,135
Africa 10,050 13,150 17,970 20,045 28,495
All nationalities(101)

(excluding EEA)

45,100 51,190 70,620 83,180 121,655

(99) The data are of the number of decisions; includes extensions granted to persons admitted or previously granted an extension of leave to remain

(100) Excludes dependants of principal applicants and the outcome of appeals.

(101) Includes visa and non-visa nationals.

(102) The Democratic Republic of the Congo, formerly known as Zaire.

(103) One or two.

Note:

Data rounded to the nearest five.

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