School Session Times

House of Lords written question – answered on 4th February 2004.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Lord Hunt of Kings Heath Labour

asked Her Majesty's Government:

Whether the Department for Education and Skills Innovation Unit, in considering proposals from schools to introduce innovative changes in the school day, requires schools to consult parents before agreeing to such changes.

Photo of Baroness Ashton of Upholland Baroness Ashton of Upholland Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare), Department for Education and Skills, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare), Department for Work and Pensions, Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Work and Pensions) (Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare) (also Department for Education and Science), Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Department for Education and Skills) (Sure Start, Early Years and Childcare) (also Department for Work and Pensions)

The Department for Education and Skills' Innovation Unit currently handles applications made under the powers to facilitate innovation set out in the Education Act 2002. Such applications have included proposals from schools to introduce innovative changes in the school day.

The Education Act 2002, Section 4, requires that if the governing body of a qualifying school, maintained by a local education authority, wishes to make an application for an order under the "Power to Innovate", they must consult that local education authority and such persons as appear to them to be appropriate. In doing so they must have regard to any guidance given by the Secretary of State which sets out advice for applicants on the issue of consultation.

In any application that involved a change to the timings of the school day, which impacts on the parental body, the department is clear that direct consultation with parents must take place.

Information on the consultation an applicant has undertaken is made available to the School Standards Minister so he can decide on whether to grant an order.

Does this answer the above question?

Yes1 person thinks so

No0 people think not

Would you like to ask a question like this yourself? Use our Freedom of Information site.