Police

Home Department written question – answered on 19th March 2002.

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Photo of James Paice James Paice Shadow Spokesperson (Home Affairs)

To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what the average cost was of employing a police constable for a year in (a) a provincial police force and (b) London in the last 12 months.

Photo of John Denham John Denham Minister (Home Office) (Police and Crime Reduction)

holding answer 4 February 2002

The pay related and notional pensions costs are set out in the table.

£
London forces Provincial
Constable (a) Constable (b) Constable (a) Constable (b)
Salary from September 2001 scales 19,842 25,095 19,842 25,095
London weighting 1,773 1,773 0 0
London Allowance 4,338 1,011 0 0
Housing/rent allowance 0 5,864 0 3,648
Earning Related National Insurance Contributions (ERNIC) 1,845 2,606 1,303 2,080
Notional pension costs (30 per cent. of salary) 5,953 7,529 5,953 7,529
Free travel 120 120 0 0
South East Allowance 0 0 (24) 0
Total 33,871 43,998 27,098 38,352

(24) Figures do not include the South East Allowance paid since 1 April 2001 to officers appointed on or after 1 September 1994 who are not in receipt of a housing allowance. The allowance, including national insurance contributions, is £2,180 for officers in Thames Valley, Essex, Kent, Hertfordshire and Surrey and £1,090 for officers in Beds, Hants and Sussex.

Notes:

1. (a) new recruit (b) Constable: average cost, including rent allowance, after eight years service.

2. On commencing service, a constable's pay from 1 September 2001 was £17,733. The direct pay element for new police recruits increases after successful completion of 31 weeks' initial training to £19,842. The latter figure is included in (a) above.

3. The figures for the Metropolitan police and City of London police include London weighting and London Allowance and the cost of free travel.

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