Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions

Health written statement – made on 24th April 2013.

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Photo of Daniel Poulter Daniel Poulter The Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Health

Today the review of the regulation of cosmetic interventions has been published. I wish to express my thanks to Sir Bruce Keogh, the chairman, and the other members of the review body for their report.

The Poly Implant Prothése (PIP) breast implant scandal highlighted the unacceptably poor quality of clinical practice in parts of the cosmetic surgery industry, as well as with other cosmetic interventions, including concerns about clinical safety and regulation. Sir Bruce Keogh, the NHS medical director, was asked in January 2012 by the then Secretary of State, my right hon. Friend Mr Lansley, to carry out a review of the regulation of cosmetic interventions. The review’s scope was broad, covering both surgical (e.g. breast implants) and non-surgical (e.g. “botox” injections) cosmetic interventions.

This review highlights how the rapid growth of the cosmetic interventions sector has outstripped the current legal framework, exposing people who undergo these procedures to a concerning lack of safeguards. It makes recommendations to improve the quality of care, to inform and empower the public and to ensure resolution and redress when things go wrong.

The review examined attempts at self-regulation to establish effective standards and found these wanting. It may be necessary, therefore, to consider new legislation or amendments to existing regulation for some of the recommendations. It may also be possible for much to be accomplished through revised professional standards and improved training.

I am supportive of the principal conclusions of the review, and the Government will make their formal written response to the recommendations before the summer recess.

“Review of the Regulation of Cosmetic Interventions—Final Report” has been placed in the Library. Copies are available to hon. Members from the Vote Office and to noble Lords from the Printed Paper Office.