Climate Change Risk Assessments

– in the Scottish Parliament on 11th March 2020.

Alert me about debates like this

Photo of Daniel Johnson Daniel Johnson Labour

8. To ask the Scottish Government how it ensures that there are adequate climate change risk assessments in place in all policy areas. (S5O-04243)

Photo of Roseanna Cunningham Roseanna Cunningham Scottish National Party

Climate change risks, including severe weather, flooding and wildfire, are included in the Scottish risk assessment process, which informs communities and responders about how to prepare for and mitigate such events.

The Scottish Government’s climate change adaptation programme follows an outcomes-based approach that is aligned to the national performance framework. That ensures that adaptation to climate change risk is integrated into wider Scottish Government policy development and service delivery.

As set out in the process, there are a range of policy-specific risk assessment tools in place, such as the national flood risk assessment.

Photo of Daniel Johnson Daniel Johnson Labour

A constituent who is a climate change scientist recently met me to point out that temperatures in excess of 30°C are likely to be more frequently experienced occurrences in Scotland, going from a rate of once in a decade to much more frequent than that. What assessment of the impact of that on schools and hospitals has been made? Obviously, excessive temperatures will have a serious impact on front-line services such as schools and hospitals.

Photo of Roseanna Cunningham Roseanna Cunningham Scottish National Party

All those risks are assessed. With regard to our assessment, I do not know that a specific risk has been attached to schools and hospitals as opposed to the public sector as a whole. I am happy to look at whether the programme drills down to something as specific as that.

There are significant concerns about our infrastructure across the board, and they are not just to do with temperature. Coastal erosion is a big issue as well, and a number of buildings and essential infrastructure developments are impacted by that, too. Sometimes there are double impacts that need to be taken into consideration.

I undertake to get back to the member on the specific question that he asks. I will ensure that if there is an answer to that question, he gets it, and if there is not, the question will be asked. I hope that we will then be able to have a proper conversation about that issue.

The Deputy Presiding Officer:

That concludes questions on environment, climate change and land reform.

Photo of Gil Paterson Gil Paterson Scottish National Party

On a point of order, Presiding Officer. That a local member was not able to ask a supplementary question on such an important subject as nuclear waste being dumped into the River Clyde system—

The Deputy Presiding Officer:

Will you sit down, please, Mr Paterson? That is not a point of order.

The Deputy Presiding Officer:

Sit down, please. It is for the Presiding Officer to decide on supplementaries in getting through questions. That is not a point of order.