Results 1–20 of 1805 for universal credit

Aerial Navigation Bill. (17 Feb 1919)

Mr Oswald Mosley: ..., and we may deduce from the Bill that we stand in very grave danger of its paralysing influence being extended to embrace the youngest child of the British public, our newly-found Air Force. It is universally admitted, I believe, to-day, that State control is beneficial in some spheres where the free play of individual competition and interest may jeopardise the safety and comfort of the...

Supply. — [4TH Allotted Day.]: MR. Long's Statement. (12 Mar 1919)

Mr Walter Long: ...and attention upon particular incidents or particular parts of the world, and a failure to recognise that the action and the support of the Navy has not been limited to a few places, but has been universal. It is not too much to say that in almost every sea in the world the Navy has made its appearance during this War. In every campaign the Navy has played a prominent part, either by...

Orders of the Day — Tea (Customs). (30 Apr 1919)

Mr William Adamson: ...on a small income, that will be necessary to enable us to meet our obligations along the lines suggested by the Chancellor of the Exchequer when those who have so flagrantly exploited the national credit and resources by their profiteering activities during the War remain in comparatively undisturbed possession of their unpatriotic gains? Just before the Easter Recess my hon. Friend the...

Orders of the Day — Supply. — [9TH Allotted Day.]: MR. Roberts' Statement. (6 May 1919)

Mr George Roberts: ...on 1st January, 1918. Meat, butter, and other articles followed shortly afterwards. A uniform scheme of national rationing came into force in July, 1918. The services rendered by these measures are universally acknowledged. There was towards the end of 1917 industrial unrest as a result of the difficulty of obtaining food and of the preference obtained by those whose purses were...

Orders of the Day — Primary Education (Belfast) Bill. (9 May 1919)

...we represent in Belfast are charged with it, it is not compatible with the facts. The greatest shortage is in the schools which belong to the religion of the majority of that city, and it is not creditable to the generosity of the rich citizens of Belfast that they should show a poorer record in voluntary subscriptions to keep up their own schools than the record of their poorer citizens....

Orders of the Day — Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1919–20. — [Progress.]: Affairs in Egypt. (15 May 1919)

Captain William Benn: ...with great meticulosity—if there is such a word—the proportion maintained between the number of English and Egyptian employés, and, if I remember rightly, Lord Cromer, in his book, takes credit to himself for having diminished the number of English employés compared with the number of Egyptian employés, and it is perfectly obvious that is the right thing to do, so far as you can...

Orders of the Day — East India Revenue Accounts. (22 May 1919)

Mr Thomas Bennett: ...?" Yes, "he said," it will, because the minds of the people of India are so constituted that if there is an open expression of dissatisfaction by Government it will do good. The wrongdoers are discredited in the eyes of their neighbours and the Government is so far strengthened. "In recent visits to India I have borne that in mind, and I have asked people in various parts of India how far...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill. (5 Jun 1919)

Mr Thomas Bennett: The hon. Member for the Scottish Universities who has just sat down has spoken with a diffidence unusual amongst cold weather visitors to India. There is much in his statement with which I agree, but perhaps he will allow me to say that on one or two points I differ from his conclusions. In the first place, I think that the Morley-Minto reforms have not been the entire failure he has taken...

Orders of the Day — Army Estimates, 1919–20.: Supplementary Vote on Account. (29 Jul 1919)

Mr Francis Mildmay: ...of the Third Army, with which I was connected in France, which first recognised the thirst of the young soldier for education, and was the first to satisfy him in some degree. It is greatly to the credit of the War Office that the importance of the possibilities in this connection were realised forthwith. A training scheme for officers was authorised in 1918. This is a most important step...

Orders of the Day — CONSOLIDATED FUND (No. 2) BILL. (7 Aug 1919)

...of three and a half months. It is absolutely vital that expenditure should be reduced by at least 50 per cent, before we can claim to have taken even the first step towards re-establishing national credit in the markets of the world. I think it would be of the greatest possible advantage to the trade of the country if some definite scheme could be produced of how the Government intend to...

Orders of the Day — Finance.: Summary of Conclusions. (29 Oct 1919)

Mr Frederick Macquisten: ...arguments are endeavouring to make a still further levy which I think would be very unjust in its incidence. Because, after all, the debt is owed by the people who have the capital, and on whose credit the War Loan has been incurred, and surely it is only fair that they should have the right to say whether they prefer to pay an exaggerated Income Tax or a, sum down? But levy on capital is...

Orders of the Day — Housing (Additional Powers) Bill. (8 Dec 1919)

Mr John Walters: ...season. Suppose hon. Members look closely at the problem now before us. Is it possible to apply any one measure or any one scheme to the solution of this great housing question? Is there any universal remedy that can be applied? I venture to suggest there is not. The problem is too big, too complicated. Look at it for a moment!Look at the problem that confronts one in housing matters in...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Wages, etc., of Officers, Seamen, and Boys, Coast Guard, and Royal Marines. (10 Dec 1919)

Sir Thomas Bramsdon: ...recommendations on their merits, and I think I am not going too far when I say that those recommendations were just, and that if the Admiralty could have carried them out it would have given universal satisfaction throughout the Navy. Of course, it is a question of money. But I suggest that the amount that the Admiralty would have had to find for these cases would not have been begrudged...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Services Supplementary Estimates, 1919–20. (12 Dec 1919)

Mr Arthur Neal: ...loans were made between the 5th February, 1917, and the 22nd February, 1919, amounting in the aggregate to £353,000. I can give further details if desired. These were carried on the Vote of Credit to the Board of Trade and dealt with in terms in the. Appropriation Account for the year. The present request is made under these circumstances: On the 1st April this year the Treasury...

Orders of the Day — Prorogation.: His Majesty's Most Gracious Speech. (28 Dec 1919)

Mr James Lowther: ...its Statesmen.. The sagacity and far-sightedness which made him the trusted leader of the people of the Dominion of South Africa, and which contributed so much to the sue- cess of the Allies, econ universal recognition at the recent deliberations in Paris. A measure which marks the first stage in the development of responsible government in India has become law, and I rely on all My...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Peace Settlement. (12 Feb 1920)

Mr Arthur Balfour: ...and, I think, with great, force, about the lamentable condition of Europe at the present time. He drew a picture in which there was not one ray of sunlight, not one gleam of colour, to relieve the universal gloom. I wish that I could contribute that ray of sunshine or illuminating colour. I do think that the situation is very bad, and it is very bad for the very reason that my noble Friend...

Orders of the Day — Increases of Wealth (War). (16 Feb 1920)

Sir William Adkins: ...for inquiry. My first point is that if it is levied after a war which of necessity involves great suffering to people who have already suffered, and which reacts on the national stability and credit, there ought not to be an enquiry at that point and at this time. My second point is that to have it now tied up with the other is to widen the area of anxiety and uncertainty which we all wish...

Orders of the Day — Silver Coinage Bill. (18 Feb 1920)

Mr Austen Chamberlain: My hon. Friend is not answering my argument, but merely interrupting it. My hon. Friend recognises that you would have to have more coinage. The hon. Member for Oxford University says, "Stop coining," and I will follow that suggestion up presently; but my hon. Friend the Member for Wirral recognises that you could not stop issuing coinage, and says that therefore you should issue notes. Very...

Orders of the Day — MR. Churchill's Statement. (23 Feb 1920)

Mr Archibald Williamson: ...period of furlough, which during 1919 rose to over 3,000,000 payments weekly. It also had to settle their accounts, including payment of War I gratuities, clothing allowances and other terminable credits. This work still continues, although in a diminishing volume. In addition, the War gratuities of several millions of men discharged before the termination of hostilities had to be assessed...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: National Expenditure. (16 Mar 1920)

Sir Robert Horne: ...were no goods against the amount which was lent, for the reason that, as soon as the goods were created, they went into a process of destruction. The result is that to-day you have all this new credit created by the Government borrowing without any goods against the credit. You have in the hands of the people a certain amount of currency notes and of deposits in banks, against which no...


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