Results 61–80 of 600 for speaker:Sir Rolf Williams OR speaker:Sir Rolf Williams OR speaker:Sir Rolf Williams

Orders of the Day — Clause 13. — (Withdrawal of Initial Allowances for Cars.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: The Minister refers to the definition … not commonly used as private vehicles … Dozens of my friends use vans as private vehicles. How can one say that a van should attract an initial allowance, but an estate car for the conveyance of a commercial traveller's products should not? The definition is appalling.

Orders of the Day — Clause 13. — (Withdrawal of Initial Allowances for Cars.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I want to get this straight. If a doctor employs a van to go on his rounds he would have the initial allowance—is that so? Because, if it is so, it should be well-known to the medical fraternity that the doctor so using a van will be allowed the initial allowance. Could the hon. Gentleman answer that specifically?

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: If there is one thing that I like not to have to attend, it is a business lunch. There is nothing that I find more disagreeable than having to go out and spend an hour or two with somebody with whom one is not very friendly to discuss some business affair. I do it extremely rarely. I should not think that I give anyone lunch for business purposes more than once in three years. One of the...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: That was not a business expense. All I am saying to the Government side of the Committee is that every hon. Member on that side tries to get in on the act. They know it as well as I do. The Prime Minister gets in on the act and he gets £4,000 tax-free for entertainment. He does not have to give any account of how or whether he spends it. It is supposedly given to him to maintain himself in...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: Thank you, Dr. King. Tax-free allowances are paid to many officials in nationalised industries. No accounts are given to any public accounting body of how those sums are spent. This runs right through every part of the activities which are encouraged by the Government side of the Committee. Hon Members opposite are always trying to get in on the act and to enjoy themselves by getting...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I have no doubt that it is very true indeed, if we could properly look into it. As my hon. Friend the Member for Torquay (Sir F. Bennett) has explained, what lies behind this is spite. It is an attempt by the Government to divert attention from some of the things they are doing which their Left wing does not like, especially the hon. Member for Putney. To keep them quiet when they see...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: The hon. Member must wait until he is called. He can make a long speech presently. If the Government think that entertainment is wrong, why do they not make all entertainment a criminal offence? Why not say that there must be no business entertainment? If it is corrupting people, if it is a waste of money, why not say that anyone who entertains anyone for business purposes is committing a...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I think that it was written back over three years. The gentleman concerned had done an extensive amount of travelling overseas. It was a matter which eventually was in the newspapers; I forget whether it was before the courts. This was charged back by the Revenue over three years. I stand to be corrected on that, but I think that it was three years. I think that the Revenue were quite right...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I could have made that point to the hon. Member, Dr. King, but I thought it best that it should come from you. What this really is, is a concealed extra tax on company profits. Entertainment will be permitted to go on, but it is not to be allowed for tax purposes. So it has to come out of the profits of the companies concerned. If it is one of the large companies with a household name...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I cannot give way. The hon. Member is to make a speech later.

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I am sorry, but I think that the trouble is that the hon. Member has been told by his Front Bench that he will have to keep his mouth shut or he will not be allowed to pair.

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: It will in many cases be quite impossible for a small company to bear the expenses out of its own profits and it is the very reason that many small companies are closely——

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: Thank you, Dr. King. A small company has to bear this expense out of its own profits. Very often, such a company is a closely controlled, or a director controlled company, and may well be subject to Surtax direction and will not be able out of its own profits to meet such expenses as these. The fact that this legislation is pure spite, and that it will badly hit the smaller man and not the...

Orders of the Day — Clause 14. — (Business Entertaining Expenses.) (20 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I am sure that the hon. Gentleman wishes to be fair. From the remarks he made it might be read that the person concerned was a personal friend of mine. That was not so. The case was reported in the newspapers.

Orders of the Day — Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty for Murder.) (19 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: Surely, what the Home Secretary is saying is that because he cannot get the whole cake he will not take a piece of it. When we discussed the Homicide Bill the right hon. and learned Gentleman, as an abolitionist, wanted complete abolition. Because that was not possible, he accepted that certain murders would still be capital murders. The House of Commons has decided that life imprisonment is...

Clause 1. — (Increase of Duties on Spirits, Beer, Wine, British Wine, and Tobacco.) (17 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: Can my hon. Friend say whether any of those who supported him in the past are among the seven Government Members in the Committee at the moment?

Clause 1. — (Increase of Duties on Spirits, Beer, Wine, British Wine, and Tobacco.) (17 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: My hon. and gallant Friend will realise that the Assistant Postmaster-General is here today. He has just put the cost of postage up 33⅓ per cent.

Clause 1. — (Increase of Duties on Spirits, Beer, Wine, British Wine, and Tobacco.) (17 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: What about Irish whiskey?

Clause 1. — (Increase of Duties on Spirits, Beer, Wine, British Wine, and Tobacco.) (17 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: On a point of order. Surely my hon. Friend, in drawing attention to the fact that the reason for these taxes was the questionable behaviour of the Chancellor of the Exchequer, was in order.

Clause 1. — (Increase of Duties on Spirits, Beer, Wine, British Wine, and Tobacco.) (17 May 1965)

Sir Rolf Williams: I have listened to discussions on this type of Amendment many times since I have been a Member of Parliament. I have listened to about 15 Budgets. On practically every one of those there were debates on the question of an impost on alcoholic liquors and on tobacco. When I watch a Chancellor of the Exchequer struggling against criticism of these taxes, if I can find anything to say to...


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