Results 1–20 of 1812 for speaker:Major Geoffrey Bing

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: New Subscribers (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: Can the right hon. Gentleman say how many of those new lines have been provided by taking away from subscribers the exclusive use of lines and making them share those lines with other subscribers, and how many have been provided as a result of fitting new cables?

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: asked the Postmaster-General the number of subscribers connected, respectively, to the Romford, Hornchurch, Upminster, Ingrebourne and Rainham Exchanges; and the number of applicants awaiting connection to each of these exchanges, respectively.

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: asked the Postmaster-General the number of applicants in the area of the Hornchurch Exchange district which have been waiting less than one, one or more, two or more and three or more years, respectively, for the installation of a telephone.

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: On a point of order. I should like to point out that the word "Exchange" in the Question is a misprint for "urban."

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: Can the right hon. Gentleman say what is the chance of accommodating the 125 who have been waiting for the whole period of this Government's term of office?

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: asked the Postmaster-General the number of business and private subscriber lines, respectively, connected to the Rainham Exchange, and the number of applications for business and private lines, respectively, at present outstanding.

Oral Answers to Questions — Telephone Service: Essex (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that there are many small business firms in the Rainham area which have been unable to obtain telephones for a considerable period—one of which cases I called to his attention? In these circumstances, does he not think that he could appeal to one or two of the very large firms who are connected to that exchange—for instance, Ford's works—to give up one...

Orders of the Day — Social Services (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: Mr. Geoffrey Bing (Hornchurch) rose—;

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: I do not intend to follow at any great length—because I wish to turn to another subject—the remarks which have been made by the Joint Parliamentary Secretary to the Ministry of Pensions and National Insurance. All I would remind him, before he leaves the Chamber, is that he might have a chat with the Government Chief Whip. His Government are engaged in trying to get Supply. We are all...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: I will give way if the hon. Gentleman wants to interrupt me.

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: I am glad to think that the hon. Gentleman will be able to get in touch with him to arrange his postal vote. Even on the Consolidated Fund Bill I do not want to be drawn into debating the merits or otherwise of the United Dominions Trust, a matter which we might explore at some length but which we might reserve, if the hon. Member wishes, for tomorrow's debate.

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: If it is possible that Mr. Gibson Jarvie was attacked unjustly—and I express no opinion about that—all that the hon. Member has to do is to come forward with this matter tomorrow. We have all tomorrow night and, possibly, Friday to debate the Consolidated Fund Bill, but that subject is really a little outside what I am dealing with at the moment. I am engaged in considering very important...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: It may well be so and, with great respect, if it is proper for me to say so, I entirely agree with your observations, Mr. Speaker. In exactly the same way when the Parliamentary Secretary was speaking he dealt with the Labour Party Manifesto, a matter for which nobody in this House has a direct responsibility. The importance of the matter is, of course, that the doctor to whom this letter was...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: I will come back a little to that if you will allow me a moment to develop the point dealing with Ministerial responsibility. As you yourself know. Mr. Speaker, the Minister of Health answered a Question the other day on the subject, and he would not have done that and pronounced on the matter unless he had some responsibility for it. I will leave this aspect of the matter merely by saying...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: That is so, of course. That is one remedy, but, Mr. Speaker, you will recall that, for instance, in one case in which some of us were interested, where it was held that a Member of Parliament sat improperly, it was agreed that it was a matter which could have been dealt with by the courts but was, in fact, dealt with by this House. The courts can, of course, punish the offender after the...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: He may well be. His name may have been used improperly, but it seems odd that the names of so many hon. Gentlemen almost exclusively on the opposite side of the House are being used in that way.

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: It is. I now turn to the point, Mr. Speaker, which you were good enough to raise with me, the difficulty of Ministerial responsibility. The right hon. Gentleman the Minister of Health himself set out in yesterday's proceedings the points upon which he accepted Ministerial responsibility. He laid down for the doctors employed in the National Health Service under his control the following code,...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: That aspect of the matter will no doubt be considered widely outside this House. We should concentrate on the simple proposition that anyone is entitled to vote and to express his opinion by secret ballot. If their names have been supplied to the agent acting, or seeking to act, on behalf of the right hon. Gentleman the Postmaster-General, that may be the explanation. There may be...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: So the right hon. Gentleman says, but what happens if these persons are canvassed before they are given the cards? The right hon. Gentleman shakes his head. Was it authorised? Does he know about it? Was the letter sent at his request? If he shakes his head, and speaks on it, he must know something about it. How does he justify the statement: "I am sure that all doctors understand the position...

Orders of the Day — General Elections (Postal Votes) (4 May 1955)

Major Geoffrey Bing: May I interrupt the swan song of the right hon. and learned Member? Quite irrespective of what he is saying, we all regret it should be his swan song, but I think he has mistaken the point. I would hate to think that on the last occasion on which he speaks the right hon. and learned Member should be mistaken. A friend can go and help someone who is incapable of visiting a doctor and get the...


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