Results 21–40 of 1401 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Louise Haigh

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: The Mayor of London has put £150 million into recruiting additional police officers. I appreciate the serious concerns in London but this is a national problem, as I have made clear and as the Home Secretary has acknowledged. This is not a London-only problem. Indeed, the increase in violence in London is actually lower than in other parts of the country, which is why a national solution...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: The right hon. Gentleman need not worry; I will not be put off at all by interventions from Government Members.

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I completely agree that the county lines emanate from many metropolitan areas, and certainly not just London—they originate with organised criminal gangs in Birmingham and on Merseyside, too. I commend the Government’s approach through the national county lines co-ordination centre. Working between police forces is a nut that we really have to crack, because the county lines...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I am sure Chelmsford has received both policemen and policewomen. I am sure the Mayor of London will be watching this debate closely, but I commit to passing the hon. Gentleman’s remarks on to him.

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I am grateful for that intervention. Across the country, such community organisations are filling a vacuum that has been created by Government cuts over the past eight years. They are doing sterling work with at-risk young people, and preventing many of them from falling into exploitation and violence. I take this opportunity to commend the work of the Scottish Government not just through the...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I heartily recommend that the hon. Lady reads the Home Office’s own analysis, which suggests that cuts to neighbourhood policing and early intervention have played a part in the rise of serious violence, but of course I accept that some excellent work is going on throughout the country. That is exactly the point I am making: we need a proper evidence-based analysis of that work to make...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: My right hon. Friend is a long-standing campaigner for the rights of shop works and I echo his point about hoping that we can do this on a cross-party basis. Concerns remain about the open sale of knives in smaller retail stores, which is an issue raised by my hon. Friend the Member for Lewisham, Deptford (Vicky Foxcroft). Many of the larger stores have taken steps to secure knives in...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: My hon. Friend brings his own personal experience to the debate and makes an important point. I am sure that will be heard in Committee. Finally, we believe that the Bill is a missed opportunity for victims. The Conservative party manifestos in 2015 and 2017 promised to enshrine in law the rights of victims, a group too often neglected by the criminal justice system. With crime surging and...

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: Yes, and I was not trying to suggest otherwise, but, as I have laid out, the number of crimes using repurposed weapons has increased significantly over the past 10 years, so it is clear that in considering the Bill we should look into how we can restrict the availability of decommissioned weapons.

Offensive Weapons Bill (27 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: My hon. Friend has done sterling work over the past three years on youth violence, and particularly on the rights of victims, and her work is one of the reasons we think it is so important to strengthen the rights of victims through this Bill. I hope that we can do that on a cross-party basis, given the promises that were made in the 2015 and 2017 Conservative manifestos. We would like to see...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I beg to move, That this House is concerned that the level of rural crime remains high; notes research by the National Famers’ Union that rural crime cost the UK economy £42.5 million in 2015; recognises that delivering public services across large, sparsely populated geographical areas can be more costly and challenging than in urban areas; agrees with the National Rural Crime...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: It may not surprise my hon. Friend to know that I am deeply unsatisfied with the resources available for policing and with the funding formula on which we base our police funding at the moment. She makes an important point. On recent visits to forces in the south-west, I was particularly struck by the challenges facing police in huge rural areas, such as those in her constituency. In the...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: My hon. Friend is absolutely right. True community policing and neighbourhood policing work very effectively with Farm Watch, Neighbourhood Watch and other voluntary organisations in our communities. We are not just talking about a police officer walking down the street with his hands in his pockets. True neighbourhood policing requires officers to engage and build relationships with...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I could not agree more. It is exactly the same in my own home force of South Yorkshire. The pernicious and long-term effects of deindustrialisation in communities are often the same issues that other rural forces and areas experience and are affected by. The feelings of isolation can be strong and overwhelming, particularly for vulnerable individuals in rural areas such as that of my hon....

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: No. I am saying that we would properly resource the police to be able to do their job, unlike the Conservative party. In reducing the police, as the Conservatives have done, to nothing more than a flashing blue light that only arrives when the absolute worst has happened, not only have they destroyed the police’s ability to prevent crime from happening in the first place; they have...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: I could not agree more. The police have been cut to a level at which they are unable to prevent and respond to crime, and the demand on them is completely unprecedented, not only from new crimes, but as a result of other services being cut. The police are now unable to respond to the basic task that we ask of them and that the Prime Minister asked them to do at the Police Federation...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: Raising the precept in the way that the Government have done is a fundamentally unfair way to fund police forces across this country. [Interruption.] I am sorry—I do not know which police force area the hon. Gentleman represents, but I am almost positive that raising the precept by 2% will result in significantly more in his force area than in my area of South Yorkshire, or in...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: My hon. Friend puts it much better than I did. Last year, the precept was able to raise £270 million. That is a drop in the ocean given that this Government have taken £2.7 billion out of policing over the past eight years. The force in the area of the hon. Member for Clacton (Giles Watling) may have been able to increase numbers from their existing point, but I am sure that they...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: There has been the same level of demand from 101 and 999 as, just a few years ago, the police would have experienced only on new year’s eve. As I say, that is coming not only from traditional crime but from the demand on other public services. This is not only wrong for the police, who are not trained or equipped to deal with the responsibilities of other public services, but, most...

Rural Crime and Public Services (6 Jun 2018)

Louise Haigh: The issue with the centralisation of services such as NPAS is that those decisions have been made for all the wrong reasons. They have been made to drive cuts, rather than being genuinely about where provision should be. We would certainly keep NPAS and other services like it under review, but those decisions need to be made on the basis of the efficiency and effectiveness of that service,...


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