Results 1–20 of 800 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Lord Tunnicliffe

Local Government: Traffic Regulation — Debate (15 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I, too, thank the noble Lord, Lord Lucas, for calling for this debate. I am in a wonderful position, in that I think I agree with everybody who has contributed. However, I shall make the curious point that I agree only in part. There are a few things running through this debate. I do not think that anyone here is calling for no regulation in parking. We all recognise that...

Local Government: Traffic Regulation — Debate (15 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I am perfectly willing to believe that the noble Lord is probably right. My problem is that I can go no further today with the brief I have in front of me. The noble Lord, Lord Filkin, pointed out that local government involvement in traffic has been a success. Most people would agree that local government is doing a better job than the police did. He made the good point that we are...

Local Government: Traffic Regulation — Debate (15 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I will certainly write to the noble Lord to cover those points to the extent to which I am able to do so.

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, we take the safety of British aid workers very seriously. The Department for International Development has revised and updated its security policy to ensure maximum protection of staff in conflict zones, in particular, but also in all overseas locations. We also support non-government partners in similar precautions. So we hope that non-government and non-British aid workers will...

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I congratulate the noble Baroness on her birthday and on once again asking me a question that I have not the slightest chance of answering. I have every confidence that the figures in the Pre-Budget Report will be committed to and I am delighted that the opposition parties are aligning with them. On the protection of aid workers, which I think is what the noble Baroness is getting...

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I can give a general answer but will write to the noble Lord on the specifics of Afghanistan because it has its own peculiar security problems. As a generality, we see a division among aid workers who are not DfID employees. Some aid workers are working for us by virtue of our grant, but we also respect those who work for organisations which choose to distance themselves from Her...

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, the DfID approach is one of proportionality. We do not have an absolute sense that aid workers have to be as secure as someone working in the United Kingdom—we take risks that are proportional to the value they are adding. In that sense, we are working towards going down the same road as the US. In a dangerous environment we will be working with volunteers. We have a stabilisation...

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I entirely accept that a response requires full consideration of evacuation and constant information to ensure that the organisation organising the aid has appropriate sensitivity, knows when the situation is changing and is able to make a rapid response. My understanding—I will write to the noble Lord on this—is that Darfur is substantially a UN-organised aid thrust. The UK has...

Aid Workers — Question (27 Jan 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I hate to share with the noble Lord the fact that I was not aware of where he was two or three days ago. I do not know whether DfID has specific plans for Sri Lanka in those circumstances, but I shall write to him.

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, all sensitive or high-value military equipment and vehicles are transported from the UK to bases in Afghanistan by air in order to prevent their theft or destruction en route. The transportation of some lower-value and non-sensitive vehicles and equipment to theatre is contracted out to commercial suppliers which are responsible for providing security en route. The cost of replacing...

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I do not accept that there is increased reliance on surface operation because of any limitation on helicopters. Commanders on the ground have sufficient assets to do key tasks. The replacement of a helicopter that is lost in combat would undoubtedly be covered from the reserve. The overall net cost of operations, as I understand it, is met from the reserve. If that is in any detail...

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, the noble Lord puts on my shoulders the heavy burden of starting a verbal war between ourselves and our greatest ally. We believe that what we are doing in Afghanistan is right and that it is important to be there. Our strategy is to support the Afghan Government to deliver security and political, social and economic developments for Afghanistan. We lead the civil military mission...

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I am afraid that I have no knowledge of any request that the Pakistani Government may have made. I know that we consider our relationship with Pakistan, and the relationship between Pakistan and Afghanistan, to be crucial, and I believe that those relations go well. If we have received any requests that can be put in the public domain, I will write to the noble Lord.

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, the general answer is that the responsibility lies with the contractor, but there is very little equipment of any value—only large vehicles which have been de-weaponed and desensitised. The expensive stuff travels by air. As I say, my general understanding is that the responsibility is in the hands of the contractor. If there is any detailed difference from that, I will write to...

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I am sorry that the noble Lord feels that I did not answer the question, but I responded as far as I could. If a helicopter is shot down, the situation is clear. My understanding is that, generally speaking, the net cost of the war is met from the reserves.

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: I am told that that is not an answer, but it seems to me that a worn-out helicopter would be a net cost of the war, and therefore the war is financed as it goes along from the reserve. The question sounds simple, but the mechanisms here are complex. I must respond to such a complex question very carefully, and I can only do that in writing.

Afghanistan: Military Equipment — Question (11 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I am afraid that I cannot know what the armed services tell the noble Lord.

Armed Forces: Recruitment — Question (12 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, recruitment to all three services has improved over the past few months, primarily as a result of targeted national, regional and local-level recruiting campaigns. There has also been a significant increase in expressions of interest through the Armed Forces recruitment offices and through online applications, which is attributed in part to the current economic circumstances and...

Armed Forces: Recruitment — Question (12 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, I will refer particularly to the harmony guidelines, which are important, and recruitment will help. Presently, the Royal Navy and Royal Marines are meeting their figure and there is a significant improvement in the Royal Air Force. The last figure we have faith in for the Army is about a 10 per cent failure. The recruitment will help but so will our commitment to the drawdown in...

Armed Forces: Recruitment — Question (12 Feb 2009)

Lord Tunnicliffe: My Lords, the specific manning pinch points are important. There is very careful tracking of all pinch points, which are being addressed by a series of actions; namely, restructuring and reducing some of the operational commitment. We are trying to reduce the voluntary outflows through financial retention incentives, which is having a positive effect. There will also be changes in the outside...


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