Results 61–80 of 800 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:George Galloway

Elected Authorities (Northern Ireland) Bill (5 Dec 1988)

George Galloway: The hon. Member for Yeovil (Mr. Ashdown) did say that.

Points of Order: Select Committee on Scottish Affairs (20 Dec 1988)

George Galloway: Despite the giggling bravado from Conservative Members, all hon. Members know that this is an auspicious occasion and that after tonight nothing will ever be the same again. In view of the hour, I have thrown my notes aside. I want to give one quotation from perhaps the greatest of all Scots, Hugh MacDiarmid. I was searching earlier in the Library for a new descriptive way of talking about a...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: "A Claim of Right for Scotland" (21 Dec 1988)

George Galloway: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland if he has received a copy of the Campaign for a Scottish Assembly document, "Claim of Right for Scotland"; and if he will make a statement on his policy towards the matters raised in the document.

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: "A Claim of Right for Scotland" (21 Dec 1988)

George Galloway: Is the Secretary of State aware of the dismay and disappointment with which his reply will be met in Scotland? In the light of last evening's events and his undoubted scrutiny of the media this morning, is the Secretary of State aware of just how isolated he and his Government are becoming on this question? With all the respect to which his great office is entitled, I ask him whether he will...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: It is with some trepidation that I rise to follow such a master parliamentary draftsman as the hon. Member for Stafford (Mr. Cash) and to oppose a Bill over which he has had an influence. He is the man who reputedly has the roundel of the Single European Act on his fuselage. I also have trepidation in opposing the Bill having just heard the fresh and livid speech of my hon. Friend the Member...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: that is a valid point and I hope to deal with it later. Some of us have bigger castles than others and some have more skeletons in those castles than others. If we have skeletons in our castles, we must be careful in a free society that we do not use our power. We have power and although I am not rich, I have more power, as the hon. Member for Cannock and Burntwood (Mr. Howarth) explained,...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: The hon. Gentleman is welcome to intervene, but my understanding, is that the philosophical position of British Conservatives has been to rely on specific remedies rather than to bestow general rights on people.

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: Edmund Burke was possibly the most conservative Member of Parliament ever. His philosophy was exceedingly conservative. He is the idelogical mentor of many Conservative Members. That cannot be gainsaid. As I understand it, it has always been the position of British Conservatives that the legislative books should not be cluttered with new legislation, unless that legislation is absolutely...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I accept that there is a difference. Although in some cases the only difference is that something which is printed and is said to be an abuse of privacy is true and something that is libellous is by definition untrue. If I write something about a person that is untrue, I have committed a libel. If I know something about that person—which he does not wish me to reveal—that is true, the...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I agree that the way in which the investigations were pursued was completely unwarranted. Whether the public has a right to know about the sex lives of politicians is a moot and debatable point, especially if those politicians are members of a party which takes a politically ideological stance against permissiveness for the family, and are for Victorian values. If in their private lives, they...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: It is arguable whether it is covered by the Bill. At the very least, it would be much more difficult for such information to be published than at present.

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I believe that the Bill—for the reasons which the hon. Member for Derby, North (Mr. Knight) has made clear—produces a potential thicket of offences and litigation which will certainly excite and encourage the saliva of our learned Friends. It would certainly be a bonanza for them.

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: The hon. Lady says "surely", but I am not so sure. All I know is that we will potentially be putting into the court rooms and into judges' chambers a thicket of judgments and decisions about what is private and what is public. I do not have the touching faith of some hon. Members in judge-made law. Anyone who has studied the "Spycatcher" affair right up to the final and upper levels of the...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I am not a lawyer, but I doubt whether it is within the law to break into premises to plant an electronic eavesdropping device.

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I would rather not give way as I have been reminded that I have been speaking for quite a time and I must get on. The hon. Member for Winchester said that it was possible to "exaggerate" the dangers of muzzling the press. I have visited many countries in Europe, Africa, Asia and the middle east where the press is muzzled very nicely thank you. It is not possible to overstate the dangers of...

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: Obviously there is a danger of that.

Orders of the Day — Protection of Privacy Bill (27 Jan 1989)

George Galloway: I will reach a conclusion shortly. I accept the points made by my hon. Friend and by the Minister. Although a Chancellor of the Exchequer may have an overdraft of £700,000 that does not, of course, negate the possibility of his being a good Chancellor. Nevertheless that information should be in the public domain so that people can weigh in the balance the financial skills, responsibility and...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Zircon Film (1 Feb 1989)

George Galloway: BBC Scotland's headquarters are in my constituency. Brian Barr, who was witch-hunted as a result of that raid, is one of my most distinguished constituents. The incredible gymnastics of the Minister's answer, supplemented by a brief quickly whispered to him by the Secretary of State, do not disguise the simple question asked by my hon. Friend the Member for Linlithgow (Mr. Dalyell). Did the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Zircon Film (1 Feb 1989)

George Galloway: Apologise then.

Royal Navy (28 Feb 1989)

George Galloway: I spoke in the debate on the Royal Navy last year immediately following the hon. Member for Maidstone (Miss Widdecombe), which I suppose shows that neither of us has moved up the pecking order, at any rate in the last 12 months. She spoke eloquently then, as she did this evening, but I hope she will forgive me if I do not follow her down the path which she took. Before coming to my main...


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