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Preamble (4 Feb 1919)

..., on his safe return to this House after his arduous and perilous military duty, we offer a warm and a cordial welcome. If I may be pardoned for a further personal reference, I would say that it is not altogether infelicitous or inappropriate that the great-grandson of the great Earl Grey of Reform renown should, apart from his personal claim, be the first to address the Members of a new...

Debate on the Address. (11 Feb 1919)

...thanks to your Majesty for the gracious Speech which your Majesty has addressed to both Houses of Parliament." The selection of a serving soldier and a sailor to Move and Second the Address is an honour conferred upon the Army and the Navy which will be warmly appreciated by the sister Services. The duty of the Mover of the Address in the past has been a difficult one. To touch on...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Industrial Unrest. (13 Feb 1919)

Mr William Brace: ...behalf of the Labour party I do so without any apology at all. I very much regret the imperative necessity which has caused us to place on the Order Paper a Motion of this character. There can be no doubt among Members in this House, and certainly no doubt among the people of the country, that this Island home of ours is face to face with a very serious situation in consequence of...

King's Speech.: Agriculture. (14 Feb 1919)

Mr Ernest Pretyman: I am sure the House is grateful to the hon. Gentleman who moved this Amendment to the Address, which, I am sure, has been done, not with the object of attacking the Government, but with the abject of giving a much-needed opportunity to tills House to consider at the earliest possible moment what is the present position of agriculture and what ought to be the future policy of the Government...

Re-Election of Ministers Bill. (17 Feb 1919)

Mr Bonar Law: I beg to move, "That the Bill be now read a second time." 4.0 P.M. The subject of the Bill is one with which Members of the House are very familiar. It has been not only a subject of debate, but of conversation, among Members for a very long time. In the past, I think, it has been regarded almost entirely from the point of view of party interest. Every Government would have liked to see the...

Aerial Navigation Bill. (17 Feb 1919)

Mr Oswald Mosley: I must crave the indulgence of the House this evening not only on the usual account of a maiden speech, but I must ask it to condone in me that very serious offence which the great Chatham once described in this House as "the atrocious crime of being a young man." That dictum from the mighty past weighs rather heavily upon me this evening from the consciousness that I am to-day the youngest...

Clause 2. — (Extension of purpose of Air Council.) (17 Feb 1919)

Major-General John Seely: In regard to the first point raised, namely, that there was no power to appoint Major-General Sykes as a member of the Air Council, the answer is that there was power to appoint him to look after civil aviation. We were so legally advised on the subject, but there was not power to appoint him a member of the Council. This measure when it becomes an Act will give us power to have a member of...

Orders of the Day — Re-Election of Ministers Bill.: Clause 2. — (Right of Certain Ministers to Sit in the House of Commons.) (18 Feb 1919)

Mr Bonar Law: I hope my right hon. Friend will not think it necessary to press this Amendment, because I really do not think he should ask the Government to agree to it. I have said quite clearly that at this moment there is no intention of appointing another Minister of that kind, and the reason we put "three" rather than any other number is that we had the feeling that the House was entitled to say there...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: Government Proposals. (18 Feb 1919)

Hon. Edward Wood: ...the advantage of great experience, and I think the criticisms which he made were criticisms to which the House will be disposed to attach much weight. I was interested in the speech delivered by my Noble Friend the Member for Oxford University. It has been a mark of all the speeches which have been delivered so far this afternoon that they have pointed to one section or another of the...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: Government Proposals. (19 Feb 1919)

Mr Gerald France: The refusal of the Government to accept what is a most reasonable suggestion seems to indicate a great lack of confidence on their part in their own proposals. Both old and new Members are convinced that some change is necessary, and the House generally wants to get on with business quite as much as the right hon. Gentleman. The Amendment, however, asks that these proposals should be given a...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: Standing Order 48. — (Nomination of Standing Committees.) (19 Feb 1919)

Mr William Joynson-Hicks: I beg to move, at the end, to insert as a new paragraph: Any Member of the House may give notice to add any number of Members not exceeding ten to a Standing Committee in respect of any Bill referred to it and such Motion shall be taken as the first Order of the Day after which such notice shall be given, and upon such Motion Mr. Speaker shall forthwith permit a brief explanatory statement...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: Government Proposals. (20 Feb 1919)

Mr James Thomas: But my hon. and learned Friend will admit at once that the Committee upstairs are not likely to go on sitting after a quarter-past eight. If the Committee meet at half-past ten and the object of the Adjournment of the House is to allow the Committee to go on sitting, I cannot conceive the Committee upstairs going on sitting after a quarter-past eight. Therefore the right hon. Gentleman could...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: New Standing Order. — (Adjournment of the House (Standing Committees.) (20 Feb 1919)

Mr John Walters: The Noble Lord has invested this proposal of the Government with somewhat of a halo of romance. When he commenced to speak I noticed the anxiety on the countenances of the occupants of the Front Bench, and as he developed the reasons why the proposal should be adopted and as for the first time those reasons dawned on the intelligence of the Government, their expression seemed to say, "Thank...

Orders of the Day — Procedure Rules.: Standing Order 1. — (Sittings of the House.) (20 Feb 1919)

Mr Donald Maclean: ...the Leader of the House has shown throughout this Debate a great desire to meet every point he possibly could consistently with the duty he felt he had to discharge to the whole House. There is no single point of real substance, so far as I have been able to see, which he has not gone a very long way to meet. It is because this proposal with which we are now face to face is one of...

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Commission.: Prime Minister's Speech. (24 Feb 1919)

Mr David Lloyd George: ...to inquire into the position of and conditions prevailing in the Coal Industry. I apologise to the House for having to place a Bill in front of the Bill dealing with National Health, but there is nothing more essential to a community than the adoption of means for the prevention of civil strife. That is the prospect with which we are confronted, and which each and all of us ought to do...

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Commission.: Coal Industry Commission Bill, (24 Feb 1919)

Mr Alfred Waterson: Then Mr. Deputy-Speaker, it is remarkable how exceedingly well many of these worthy gentlemen thrive on their losses. I have on more than one occasion had to deal not only with individuals of the class represented by the hon. Gentleman as business men, but I have also had to deal with companies in which I have had the privilege of negotiating conditions, and so on, and they always put forward...

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Commission Bill.: Clause 1. — (Appointment of Commissioners.) (25 Feb 1919)

.... They are giving a direct incentive to the Commission to report in a certain way. We surely want to have the Commission made absolutely fair. We want to get for it the sympathy and the support not alone of the miners, not alone of the coal-owners, butof the general community. If the general community imagines that this is a biassed Commission it will have no confidence in its finding, and...

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Commission Bill.: Clause 5. — (Reports.) (25 Feb 1919)

Mr William Brace: ...of this very important Bill. We have been discussing the principle of an important question to-day, that of nationalisation. The question of nationalisation is important, but nationalisation is not pressing in the same sense that this questionis pressing. As the Committee will know, the Miners'Federation meets in conference to-morrow. It will meet in conference to receive the result of the...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Health Bill. (26 Feb 1919)

Captain Charles Loseby: ...from the elevated pedestal of one who has on a previous occasion addressed this House, may I presume to congratulate the last speaker on his pointed, interesting, and illuminating address. If I may not do this as a Member I should like to be allowed to do it as an individual. The principle involved in this Bill touches so closely upon the fundamental policy of the group of which I am a...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Secret Service. (27 Feb 1919)

Mr Stanley Baldwin: I fully sympathise with the remarks of my hon. Friends opposite. As to the point put to me by my hon. Friend opposite, the reason I am unable to answer him is that I have absolutely no knowledge of the question, or as to where the Secret Service money goes. That is not within my province. I should, however, like, very earnestly, to point out this, that there is nothing easier than to make...


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