Results 1–20 of 100 for cover human intelligence

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Orders of the Day — Supply. — [5TH March].: Vote on Account. (10 Mar 1919)

Mr James Sexton: ...into the whole matter, and was responsible for the creation of dock regulations for the protection of life and limb. These regulations took in a quarter of a million more men than were previously covered by the Factory Acts, but the appointment of factory inspectors for the purpose of carrying out these regulations is of such a character that an ordinary docker who knows his business is...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Ways and Communications Bill.: Unified Transportation Control. (17 Mar 1919)

Mr Alfred Short: ...the commerce produced, we cannot hope to face with equanimity the great financial burden that lies in front of us. Unless there is a new outlook, and a new point of view thrown upon the screen of human and industrial activity, we shall not be able to meet that demand for a finer life which the workers and the people of this country are making upon the Government and the State. I welcome...

Orders of the Day — Statement by DR. Addison. (7 Apr 1919)

Mr John Davison: ...which everyone of us will strive to attain. It constitutes, therefore, part of the policy of the Government in reconstruction that the scientific development of our national life should be on a humane and civilised basis. The provisions of the Bill afford a golden opportunity for putting into practical operation the sentiments expressed in the fine statements of eminent statesmen during...

Orders of the Day — Housing in Ireland. (13 May 1919)

Mr Joseph Devlin: ...the root of nearly every evil. Good housing is, in my judgment, the inspiration of cleanliness and the development of character and the fashioning of that higher and nobler life which the mass of humanity are aiming at in every intelligent community to-day. Those of us who have followed the agricultural development of Ireland during the last twenty years, must recognise how splendid is the...

Orders of the Day — Sea, Land, and Air War Services.: Money Grants by Parliament. (6 Aug 1919)

Mr David Lloyd George: ...lives in the service of their country: That the thanks of this House be accorded to the members of the Royal Army Medical Corps and of the Indian Medical Service for the skilful discharge of their humane office, and for the unprecedented success which attended their unremitting labours to preserve the armed Forces of the Crown from the ravages of disease: That the thanks of this House be...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Army Estimates, 1920–21. (22 Mar 1920)

Sir Francis Fremantle: ...; of the Crown. Confining myself alone to the medical service, you have not only the Army Medical Corps and the Navy and the Flying Corps now starting a medical service of its own, but the ground covered by the Army Medical Corps frequently interleaves and overlaps the ground covered by the Indian Medical Service, by the Colonial Office, and by the Foreign Office. For Pensions we get...

Orders of the Day — Importation of Plumage (Prohibition) Bill. (30 Apr 1920)

Colonel Charles Yate: ...sold to a Sahib on the Sutlej…. Now my ideas on the subject are, that the feather traders, knowing it to be illegal to destroy egrets for their feathers, keep these decoy birds in more or less humane surroundings during the cold weather, when they are likely to be visited by European officials, and have invented the story regarding their breeding in captivity, and all the evidence I have...

Orders of the Day — Indemnity Bill. (3 May 1920)

Sir William Adkins: ...hon. Friend pointed out that no one wants a person whose house or warehouse or factory has been taken to have inflated profits which arise out of the War. It would be far easier for those skilled intelligences now grouped on the Treasury Bench and for such gifted human beings to have devised a Bill which entirely prevented any such improper benefits arising to persons whose property had...

Orders of the Day — CONSOLIDATED FUND (No. 2) BILL.: Ireland. (28 Mar 1922)

Mr Joseph Devlin: ...I have been listening to the eloquent speeches of distinguished ladies asking for £27,000, which you are economising, for the maintenance of women police to do not only a great work, but to serve humanity and lift those poor fallen women and help them: and you are taking that £27,000 away. Yet you are paymasters of those whom, I declare here to-night in the House, are responsible for...

Orders of the Day — Supply (22 Mar 1923)

Sir James Macpherson: ...must be kept on because they have got a great many post-War problems to consider which are either secret or are not understanded of the man in the street. We do not realise the problems which an intelligence staff have got to consider after a great war. That is one of the reasons why I can imagine these officers are kept there at present. Again the British Army, as I have tried to show is,...

Orders of the Day — Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Home Office. (12 Jul 1923)

Lord Henry Cavendish-Bentinck: ...in laundries. There were eight accidents in 1921 in connection with what are called hydro extractors. The Inspector's Report says that certain accidents could have been avoided if an automatic cover had been fixed. Why, was it not fixed? I take it the constant pressure of the inspectorate was not there to see it was fixed. One looks under the head of Rubber Mixing Rolls. There were 56...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Labour Vote of Censure. (17 Jan 1924)

...save this country from all the evils and disabilities of unemployment, namely, protective tariffs. We may be defeated —we do not worry about that—but I still believe that with education and an intelligent group of people to put it before this country, with honesty of expression on the other side, which we did not have last time, and with an absence of mis-statements, deliberate...

Orders of the Day — Export Trade. (21 May 1924)

Major Archibald Church: In rising to address the House on this all-important matter of export trade, I should like, if I may, to traverse some of the ground which has already been covered by the hon. Mover and the hon. Seconder of the Motion. Both of them, it was obvious, were dealing with the subject of industrial research, and yet in their Motion for the appointment of this Committee, I find no recommendation that...

Orders of the Day — China Indemnity (Application) Bill.: Subversive Propaganda (Great Britain and the Empire.) (3 Mar 1925)

Mr John Wheatley: ...-class population have to exist. Suppose that to-morrow morning I were able, as a result of my economic power, to awaken the hon. Member for Frome (Mr. G. Peto) in his bed at six o'clock, and to cover him with the oily and filthy rags which are euphemistically described as the clothing of a miner, and compel him to go down a mine and to endure for even the statutory seven hours the...

Orders of the Day — Supply. (6 Jul 1925)

Mr Walter Runciman: I am glad to find that the hon. Gentleman confirms that. I want to draw a lesson from it, not that you should never be extortionate, but that immediately you eliminate that human element where men get into the habit of dealing one with another, by give and take, and you insist that the rules of a Government Department shall be carried out rigidly so that they will pass muster before the...

Orders of the Day — India Office. (9 Jul 1925)

Mr Ramsay Macdonald: ...all right. That is no reflection upon the East. It is coming. It is coming in India; it is coming in China; it is coming in Japan. I am not at all sure but that India is leading the East in that human sensibility. The growth is enormous. Those who were in India a considerable number of years ago can remember the callous indifference to conditions in the Bombay cotton mills—callous...

Orders of the Day — Communist Prosecution.: Vote of Censure Proposed. (1 Dec 1925)

Mr Shapurji Saklatvala: The speech that the Home Secretary has made in reply to the Motion has rather created a tendency to cover up the main issue, and take little items and details for this House to discuss which are really of no matter. There is a profound belief that by the experience we get when we come into this House we become quite a different species of man. There are people outside who are upholders of...

Orders of the Day — Educational Policy. (8 Feb 1926)

Mr Herbert Fisher: ...or of the Government for looking out for a definite financial policy. I am the last person to suggest that the grant formula which was devised in 1916 for elementary education is the last word of human wisdom. It probably does need a certain amount of revision in the light of changing needs. It may well be that the rate-equalising factor is not sufficiently strong, and that in the...

Orders of the Day — Factories Bill. (26 Mar 1926)

Mr Arthur Henderson: ...sit down that his own statements during the last two years are directly responsible for creating that position. The speech of the Mover was so clear, that I think it is quite unnecessary for me to cover the ground that she has already traversed. I will, however, emphasise the point she made very early in her speech. I would like all Members, even those who are going to vote for this...

Orders of the Day — Hours of Industrial Employ Ment Bill. (30 Apr 1926)

Mr Alfred Short: ...this is a very mild proposition, because I well recall the late Lord Leverhulme advocating a 6-hour day, and I believe that if we used a little common sense in the organisation of our material and human resources we should be able to reduce our hours to six, and possibly at a later stage to four a day. The great argument in favour of the provisions of this Bill is that 13 great groups of...


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