Results 1–20 of 40 for cover human intelligence source (criminal conduct) bill

Did you mean over Human Intelligence source (Criminal Conduct) Bill?

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 57 - National security proceedings (8 Sep 2022)

Jess Phillips: ...the individual doing harm, but it is the state that intervenes to protect the parties, or the state that allows cases to be closed. The idea that the state does not have a responsibility for the human rights of a victim of crime such as this when it comes to how they are treated when they try to interact with the state is, I am afraid, for the birds. Almost every single rape victim I have...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Criminal Conduct Authorisations) (Amendment) Order 2021 - Motion to Regret (12 Oct 2021)

Baroness D'Souza: My Lords, I am very grateful that some noble Lords are still here. That is very nice. I make no apologies for returning to the Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Act 2021, which was so thoroughly debated and amended in this House earlier this year. As I said while the Bill was passing through this House, I am truly happy that a previously secret process has been put on a...

Police, Crime, Sentencing and Court Bill: New Clause 1 - Harassment in a public place (5 Jul 2021)

Harriet Harman: ...person, from a motor vehicle while it is in a street or public place, or in a street or public place while in the immediate vicinity of a motor vehicle that they have just got out of, to engage in conduct which amounts to harassment in such manner or in such circumstances as to be likely to cause annoyance, alarm, distress, or nuisance to any other person. (2) A person guilty of an offence...

Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill: Clause 6 - “Relevant offence” (21 Apr 2021)

Kim Johnson: Yesterday, the Government at last agreed to table an amendment to exclude torture, genocide and crimes against humanity from the scope of the Overseas Operations (Service Personnel and Veterans) Bill before us today. While I am thankful for this, the fact that such provisions were considered in the first place is outrageous, and raises a number of red flags about the Bill’s intent and its...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill: After Clause 2 - Criminal injuries compensation (24 Feb 2021)

Julian Lewis: Right from the outset, the Intelligence and Security Committee has supported the principle behind the Bill, although we have also welcomed attempts by Members in both Houses to improve it. It is a very important Bill. Covert human intelligence sources or agents provide vital information to assist the security and intelligence agencies in their investigations. They save lives. As the head of...

Public Bill Committee: Telecommunications (Security) Bill: Clause 17 - Laying before Parliament (26 Jan 2021)

Kevan Jones: ...forever. I think he does not quite understand why the Government are not at least moving on this. The ISC’s remit is defined in the Justice and Security Act 2013. It sets out which Departments we cover, and the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport is not one of them. However, as I said last week, security is increasingly being covered by other Departments, and this Bill is a...

Scottish Parliament: Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill (19 Jan 2021)

Humza Yousaf: ...get to that in a little more detail very shortly. There have been some limited improvements but, unfortunately, I remain unconvinced that sufficient safeguards and protections are built in to the bill. Throughout the bill’s passage through the Westminster process, I have continued to have dialogue with the Rt Hon James Brokenshire, who I understand has taken a period of curative leave,...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Report (2nd Day): Amendment 15 (13 Jan 2021)

Lord Rosser: ...We know only too well that what they do makes a real difference. Amendment 15, so ably moved by my noble friend Lady Massey of Darwen and to which my name is also attached, would put limits in the Bill on the crimes that could be authorised under a criminal conduct authorisation. The serious crimes that could not be authorised would cover murder, grievous bodily harm, torture and degrading...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Report (2nd Day): Amendment 12 (13 Jan 2021)

Lord Paddick: ...the ends do not justify the means, in the same way that using children as informants or agents is difficult to justify under any circumstances. Regrettably, banning the use of children as covert human intelligence sources is outside the scope of the Bill. He went on to recall the contribution of the noble Baroness, Lady Chakrabarti, who suggested as an alternative to using children using...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Report (1st Day): Amendment 5 (11 Jan 2021)

Lord Paddick: My Lords, it is again a pleasure to follow the noble Lord, Lord Rosser. We agree with the arguments he put forward for the need for additional safeguards, beyond what is contained in the Bill. My noble friend Lady Hamwee and I have Amendments 17 and 43 in this group. Amendment 43 provides for a senior judge to undertake a review of the use of informants and agents and their participation in...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Report (1st Day): Amendment 1 (11 Jan 2021)

Baroness Williams of Trafford: My Lords, I thank all noble Lords who have taken part in this debate, which I think has gone on now for over two and a half hours, signalling the importance of this subject and this Bill. The noble Baroness, Lady Chakrabarti, started off by really pressing the importance of parliamentary democracy and the rule of law. She was, of course, supported in that endeavour by the noble Baronesses,...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (4th Day): Amendment 75A (10 Dec 2020)

Lord Rosser: Two amendments in this group stipulate the action that the Investigatory Powers Commissioner must take on becoming aware of unlawful or inappropriate conduct linked to a criminal conduct authorisation, or on becoming aware of an inappropriately granted or unlawful criminal conduct authorisation. I will listen with interest to the Government’s response to these two amendments. A third...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (3rd Day): Amendment 43 (3 Dec 2020)

Lord Young of Cookham: My Lords, along with the noble Baroness, Lady Chakrabarti, the right reverend Prelate the Bishop of Durham and the noble Baroness, Lady Bull, I have tabled Amendment 43, to exclude the granting of criminal conduct authorisations to children. I am grateful for the helpful meeting with my noble friend the Minister, James Brokenshire and Home Office officials, who talked me through the need for...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (3rd Day): Amendment 41 (3 Dec 2020)

Baroness Chakrabarti: ...future. No disrespect is intended to a Government of any particular stripe. It has been drafted with some care, because I understand that it is difficult to limit the precise positive purposes of a covert human intelligence source, not least because the Government have chosen in this legislation to cover a wide range of public authorities and their investigatory, regulatory and...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (3rd Day): Amendment 39 (3 Dec 2020)

Lord Paddick: My Lords, I share the concerns of the noble Lord, Lord Anderson of Ipswich, about seeking clarity as to who is covered not just because a criminal conduct authorisation authorises somebody to commit a crime, but because they have, as a consequence, both civil and criminal legal immunity. As we and other noble Lords have argued, immunity from prosecution should be decided after the event by...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (3rd Day): Amendment 34 (3 Dec 2020)

Lord Rosser: There are a number of amendments in this group relating to human rights. They variously provide that a criminal conduct authorisation: may not authorise activity that would be incompatible with convention rights; may not authorise murder, torture or rape, or a person under the age of 18 to engage in criminal conduct; cannot authorise causing death or grievous bodily harm, sexual violation or...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (3rd Day): Amendment 22 (3 Dec 2020)

Baroness Chakrabarti: My Lords, I am grateful to all noble Lords for the care with which they have approached this group, which once more highlights the gravity of the development of this legislation to enable statutory criminal conduct authorisations with total immunity for the first time in our law. I will not rehearse the various arguments, most of which I agree with, but I will respond to the noble Lord, Lord...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (2nd Day): Amendment 16 (1 Dec 2020)

Baroness Hamwee: ...—to inform and improve the future. That was rather what my noble friend Lord Thomas of Gresford was talking about, with his reference to the range of organisations from which authorisations for criminal conduct may come. He mentioned people entitled to give authorisations who will not have the same experience as those in the police and intelligence services. I hope noble Lords will...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (2nd Day) (1 Dec 2020)

Lord Paddick: ...this group are on prior authorisation by a judge; by an investigatory powers commissioner; by an investigatory powers commissioner unless it is urgent; by an investigatory powers commissioner if a criminal conduct authority is to be used to identify a journalistic source; and by a Secretary of State. Another amendment requires that an investigatory powers commissioner be notified “as...

Covert Human Intelligence Sources (Criminal Conduct) Bill - Committee (1st Day): Amendment 11 (24 Nov 2020)

Lord Hain: ...to my noble friend Lord Blunkett, a former Home Secretary, who would also have added his name had not the list been full. This amendment is very straightforward. It ensures that: “The granting of criminal conduct authorisations under subsection (1) may not take place until a warrant has been issued by the Secretary of State.” My noble friend Lord Blunkett and I both signed hundreds of...


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