Results 1–20 of 36 for back live matter speaker:Lord Dholakia

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Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975 (Amendment) (England and Wales) Order 2019 - Motion to Approve: Amendment to the Motion (20 May 2019)

Lord Dholakia: My Lords, I declare an interest in this matter. In 2011, I promoted a Private Member’s Bill, the Rehabilitation of Offenders (Amendment) Bill. It had taken the Government nearly 40 years, despite many reviews, to finally consider what was right and proper in dealing with offenders and their rehabilitation process. The purpose of the Bill was that, after a specified rehabilitation period,...

Outcome of the European Union Referendum - Motion to Take Note (Continued) (5 Jul 2016)

Lord Dholakia: ...sights from being little Englanders to look at the changing world where globalisation is an everyday reality. We cannot ignore a market of over 350 million people on our doorstep. No one owes us a living: we are all interdependent. The issues that affect every citizen in our country include global terrorism, cross-border crime, human rights and matters relating to trafficking and drugs....

Assisted Dying Bill [HL]: Second Reading (18 Jul 2014)

Lord Dholakia: Similarly, my Lords, Desmond Tutu has openly backed the right of the terminally ill to end their lives with dignity: “I revere the sanctity of life—but not at any cost ... why exit in the fog of sedation when there’s the alternative of being alert and truly present with loved ones?” There are also many Jewish clergy who have come to view assisted dying as a religiously valid choice...

Offender Rehabilitation Bill [HL] — Second Reading (20 May 2013)

Lord Dholakia: ...of the advantages of being deputy to my noble friend Lord McNally is that I can knock on his door to talk about party business. Inevitably, most of the time we end up talking about criminal justice matters. I am well aware that he has recognised that the current system of rehabilitation is just not working. This is just not good enough for offenders, victims of crime, or the community,...

British Council: Funding — Question for Short Debate (19 Jul 2012)

Lord Dholakia: ...within the context of the important work of the British Council. I first thank the noble Lord, Lord Bach, for securing this debate. The noble Lord and I have co-operated on many criminal justice matters, particularly when he served as the Minister in the previous Administration. He is absolutely right that the British Council is the acceptable face of the British Government abroad. Few...

UK Border Agency — Motion to Take Note (19 Jul 2012)

Lord Dholakia: ...debate. He is probably the best qualified person to speak on border controls. His tireless campaigning on behalf of refugees and asylum seekers is legendary. A lot of people across the world are alive today because of his work on the rights and liberties of the individual. Headlines in this week's papers are unlikely to build confidence in the way UKBA conducts its business. Performance...

Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Bill — Second Reading (21 Nov 2011)

Lord Dholakia: ...the fact that he or she has already been held in custody on remand. Nevertheless, to deprive someone of their liberty when they have not yet been found guilty of a crime is an extremely serious matter. It is surely right to ensure that we are not using custodial remands where the severity of this measure is disproportionate to the seriousness of the alleged offence. I therefore strongly...

Queen's Speech — Debate (3rd Day) (27 May 2010)

Lord Dholakia: My Lords, this debate gives us an opportunity to look back at the criminal justice system when the Conservatives were last in power. Ken Clarke was the Home Secretary, and one fact remains: at that time, the prison population was about 44,000-the figure cited earlier by the noble and learned Lord, Lord Woolf. The legacy that the Labour Party has left us is that the number in prison exceeds...

International Women's Day — Debate (4 Mar 2010)

Lord Dholakia: ...to repeat them. The statistics are predictable. The rate of advancement of women has been slow, and there remain many areas and positions where women are significantly underrepresented. I will come back to my perennial grumble. I say this every time I speak in such debates. One significant area where there is zero representation of women is on our Bishops' Benches. I do not for one minute...

Queen's Speech — Debate (3rd Day) (Continued) (23 Nov 2009)

Lord Dholakia: My Lords, this is the last gracious Speech before we head for the general election next year. It is less tempting to speak on what is proposed in the Queen's Speech than to look back to the general election of 1997 and take stock of the Government's record on crime and justice matters since then. The Government can produce the statistics to justify their record, but the fact remains that fear...

Families, Community Cohesion and Social Action (28 Feb 2008)

Lord Dholakia: ...better redress and better opportunity for communities to own and run local services". There is no problem with that. However, in some areas of government responsibilities, such as criminal justice matters, I see a tendency not to devolve but to centralise power. Communities and individuals, particularly young people, are less inclined to participate in our democratic process if they feel...

Debate on the Address (12 Nov 2007)

Lord Dholakia: ...UK. Multiculturalism is essential to the future of the world and especially to London. The ability of our city to prosper is wholly dependent upon us having a great mutual respect for each others' backgrounds, cultures and practices". The question of identity is complex, but it need not be so. Defining Britishness is not the full answer. Very recently, a British national daily newspaper...

Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill (22 May 2007)

Lord Dholakia: ...a little while ago; that the original amendment to bring deaths in police custody and prison custody within the ambit of the Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill received very strong backing when it was before your Lordships' House: it had a substantial majority. Today's debate on the Commons amendment does not help to rectify the anomaly that many noble Lords pointed out...

Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill (5 Feb 2007)

Lord Dholakia: ...Draft Bill for Reform, the Government argued that deaths in custody should be exempted from the scope of the Bill on the grounds that, "organisational failings in these areas are more appropriately matters for wider forms of public and democratic accountability". They argued that deaths in prisons are, "subject to rigorous independent investigations through public inquests before juries...

Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974: Reform (6 Dec 2006)

Lord Dholakia: ...of Offenders Act 1974. My Lords, first, I thank my noble friend Lord Addington and the noble Baroness, Lady Seccombe, for putting down their names to speak in this short debate. Dealing with matters affecting offenders is not a very popular cause. There are no thanks but, in a civilised society, we must never be afraid to raise our concerns. There are some shocking statistics. More than 65...

Health: Diabetes (4 Dec 2006)

Lord Dholakia: My Lords, just before entering the Chamber, I had the privilege to talk to my noble friend Lord Patel. His contribution on medical matters is well known. He said that it is important to recognise diabetes not simply for what it is, but because of its consequences, which lead to so many complications, including organ failure. What he said has been reflected so well in this debate. First, I...

Churches and Cities (19 May 2006)

Lord Dholakia: ...without studying the detailed recommendation to promote our multi-cultural Britain. The report involved two years of hard work and was undertaken by 22 distinguished individuals drawn from many backgrounds and different walks of life who had a long record of active theoretical and practical engagement with race-related issues in Britain and elsewhere. I am afraid that the Churches remained...

Honour Killings (15 Dec 2005)

Lord Dholakia: ...subject needs to be addressed because honour killing is a practice that we must condemn. As my noble friend said, and as cited by the noble Baroness, Lady Rendell, murder is murder; it does not matter how you describe it. The sooner that we remove the word honour and start to talk about murder, the better. Our starting point is that a single incident is one too many and no civilised nation...

Female Genital Mutilation (8 Dec 2005)

Lord Dholakia: .... It does nothing of the sort. All those who work with children, in a voluntary or statutory capacity, are interested in achieving lasting benefits for children in the communities in which they live. We all want to make children's rights a reality. It cannot be disputed that FGM causes unnecessary suffering to girls. It is a harmful practice, and rightly we condemn it. The right reverend...

Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Bill (6 Dec 2005)

Lord Dholakia: ...better when one is aware that there is a higher authority able to scrutinise that decision. I spoke earlier about the contradiction in government policies. Nowhere is this more obvious than in matters relating to overseas students. Let us talk about the Prime Minister's initiative, launched in 1999, to attract 50,000 extra international students into higher education by 2004–05. Then let...


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