Results 6901–6920 of 6935 for abortion

Wages Dispute.: Conference Proposals. (7 Apr 1921)

Mr David Lloyd George: ...heard, as preliminary conditions until we entered this morning, I shall be delighted. I did my best to induce the Miners' Federation to withdraw them, but there is nothing worse than to have an abortive conference between the miners' leaders and the mineowners, and, if a condition of this kind were repeated, and the Miners' Federation insisted upon it, it would simply be a second abortive...

Wages Dispute.: Motion for Adjournment. (7 Apr 1921)

Mr John Wallace: ...reinforce in a very few words the appeals which have been made to the Government from nearly every quarter of the House. I only wish that the negotiations which started this morning, and came to an abortive close, could have been continued in the same tone and spirit which has characterised the Debate here this afternoon. It is most unfortunate that these negotiations here not continued. I...

Civil Services and Revenue Depart- Ments Supplementary Estimates, 1920–21.: Law Charges. (4 Mar 1921)

Mr Stanley Baldwin: ...been discovered on intervention leads to prosecutions for perjury and, I may add, a very regrettable circumstance, there has also been a marked increase this year in the cases of prosecution for abortion. Those two causes form a very great deal of the increase under B, and, of course, the divorce cases account entirely for the increase under F. In 1915–16 there were 962 inquiries in...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: DECREE or THE BISHOP OF CORK IN REFERENCE TO AMBUSHES, KIDNAPPING AND MURDER. (21 Feb 1921)

Mr Herbert Asquith: ...—I think it was the Government of Lord Palmerston —sent out at [...] a Judicial Commission to Jamaica to inquire into the facts. What happened, even to come down to a much later date, after the abortive attempt at a rebellion in the year 1916? The Government, of which I was head and of which the right hon. Gentleman opposite was a member, at once appointed a Commission, which was...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Mines Department of the Board of Trade. (1 Dec 1920)

Mr William Bridgeman: ...not regarded as about to be taken over when we made the estimate of £250,000 a year. An hon. Member spoke about area boards. Under the Act, if any of the parties render the scheme of area boards abortive by not appointing representatives on them, that part of the Act falls out. He seems to think it is in some way a fault of the Department that the area board system has not already been...

Orders of the Day — Women, Young Persons, and Children (Employment) Bill: New Clause. — (Employment of women and young persons in shifts.) (29 Nov 1920)

Sir Edmund Bartley-Denniss: ...that putting in the words the majority of workpeople concerned would not meet the case. The Labour party and Members from Lancashire have seen the point which I have made. We do not want to have an abortive discussion to-morrow. The Home Secretary has an idea that if there is joint representation of the organisation of the employer and the workman that would solve the situation. Again,...

Oral Answers to Questions — Housing.: Boundary Extensions (Leeds and Bradford). (10 Nov 1920)

Mr Walter Forrest: ...in favour of their proposals, or that they are able to prove to the Ministry that there are good grounds of public policy for the absorption proposed; whether, with the object of avoiding an abortive inquiry, with its very great outlay of money, he will submit the statements made in pursuance of the above by the applicants to the representatives of these areas which it is proposed should...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Health (Miscellaneous Provisions) Bill. (9 Nov 1920)

Sir Gerald Hurst: .... The First Schedule contains the procedure which it is suggested should be adopted in bringing Clause 1 into operation. I must say it is very vague and sketchy. The House will remember how largely abortive the provisions of the Housing (Additional Powers) Act, 1919, have been owing to the decision in the Court of Appeal in July last in the Huddersfield case, which more or less decided...

Orders of the Day — Women and Young Persons (Employment in Lead Pro- Cesses) Bill. (1 Nov 1920)

Mr Walter Elliot: ...on lead processes. It is all very well to crack jokes, but the use of lead and the absorption of lead into the human body, though not a severe thing for a man is for a woman, and is the cause of abortion and other complaints. When an agreement like this is reached after getting together the representatives of all the civilised countries and is brought back to this House, instead of being...

Orders of the Day — Unemployment.: Vote of Censure Proposed. (21 Oct 1920)

Mr John Hodge: ...these men in, why did the Government stand in the way? To show that something had been done the secretary of our organisation wrote to the Ministry of Labour, after those negotiations had proved abortive and the Treasury had turned down the scheme because it cost money. The Treasury usually turns these things down, but it depends on the Minister as to whether they are turned down or not....

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry.: Miners' Strike. (21 Oct 1920)

Mr David Lloyd George: ...to him that, in my opinion, we had to proceed cautiously because, as his experience, as well as mine and others, in the matter of trying to settle strikes shows, there is nothing worse than an abortive conference. Therefore, before a full conference was summoned, it, was very desirable that the ground should be prospected, not with a view of arriving at a settlement—because no one would...

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Textile Industry Conference. (8 Jul 1920)

Mr Walter Elliot: ...had been postponed; whether on payment of their expenses by the Ministry of Labour they returned home without knowing the subject which they were summoned to discuss, the Conference being abortive in spite of a total cost to the taxpayer of about £400?

Orders of the Day — League of Nations.: Statement by MR. Balfour. (17 Jun 1920)

Mr George Barnes: ..., unfortunately, he has been turned down by his own people, and therefore the heroic efforts he has since made to make effective the principles enunciated at Paris have been for the time being made abortive. But there were other countries who were represented on President Wilson's Commission. These are still committed to the pledges made by their representatives. The Noble Lord, the Member...

Orders of the Day — Clause 4. — (Companies to be liable for offences the same as individuals.) (11 Jun 1920)

Mr Walter Elliot: ...foot-and-mouth disease. The Veterinary Surgeons College of Glasgow, which will be closely affected by this Bill, has many other things up for discussion. It has got the whole question of contagious abortion, some sort of epizootic infection, which is causing enormous losses every year to the herds of this country. There is all the sheep diseases, which it is of the highest importance to...

Orders of the Day — Bastardy Bill. (7 May 1920)

Sir Henry Maddocks: ...nothing that the father can do will prevent publicity. The information must be given to the Collecting Officer, and she knows that her shame must become known. Look at the inducement to procure abortion; look at the inducement to child murder; look at the inducement to concealment of birth. We see enough of it as the law stands, but, if this Bill be put on the Statute Book, I venture to...

Supply [22ND April].: Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. (4 May 1920)

Sir Beville Stanier: ...about which we want to know, namely, the Veterinary Laboratory. A wonderful work is going on there in the production of the sera for inoculation against disease, and especially against epizootic abortion in cows. At isolated places in this country, small associations have been formed for inoculating animals in the district. We have had one in North Shropshire, and I am sorry to see that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Poland.: International Finance Conference. (3 May 1920)

Commander Hon. Joseph Kenworthy: What will be the use of a financial discussion about the position of Europe unless all States are invited to enter into it, as otherwise it will be abortive?

Treaties of Peace (Austria and Bulgaria) Bill.: Clause 1. — (Power of His Majesty to give Effect to Peace Treaties.) (19 Apr 1920)

too much weight to the point of view of capitalist interests in the question of peace terms, because if they do they may yet find their effort abortive, and they may find that, not in the country they are considering, but even in this country, where the feeling of Labour is very strong in these matters, although not quite so demonstrative as it is in the nation to Which we are referring, they...

Orders of the Day — Government of Ireland Bill. (30 Mar 1920)

Mr Stephen Walsh: ...? There is some reason, not much, for the establishment of the Provisional Councils suggested by the right hon. Member for Birmingham 35 years ago. What possible reason can there be to set up an abortion such as this, which is neither a county nor a province, but which is really a desperate expedient resorted to for the definite purpose of retaining the predominance of the Ulster mind in...

Orders of the Day — Government of Ireland Bill. (29 Mar 1920)

Mr James Seddon: ...plan of giving a Republican Government to Ireland at the present time. For many years every effort that has been made has been dogged by cruel pervisity. In 1795 Lord FitzGerald's mission was made abortive through an accident. In 1885 and 1893, when the hopes of Ireland were strong, another unfortunate mistake took place which threw back for another 35 years the cause of Home Rule. In 1920...


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