Results 1–20 of 100 for raw sewage

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Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. (21 Jan 1924)

Mr Stanley Baldwin: ...be very glad to see it investigated by those who are better competent to investigate it than I am. It does cause me concern, and it is this. We have in this country to pay not only for food and raw material, but also for a large quantity of manufactured goods, while we export our manufactured goods, and over and above all that we have now to find some £30,000,000 or more a year in payment...

Rural Industry. (30 Mar 1927)

Mr William Wright: ...prosperous farms in South Yorkshire. After he left it failed, because two farmers got it who had insufficient capital and were without farming experience, and when my father's supervision was withdrawn the farm reverted to its original condition. One can remember the lessons of one's youth for a long period, and I have always been thankful to have that particular experience in my early...

Class 1.: Privy Seal Office. (19 May 1930)

Mr Harold Balfour: ...high level, having regard to the economic facts. We are forcing our productive industries to pay more for coal than they would pay in a completely Free Trade market. Our power, water, gas, sewage disposal, housing, are all protected industries at the present time. They are sheltered. They have strong trade union agreements, and, under that form of Protection, their commodities cannot be...

Orders of the Day — Supply. (25 Jun 1931)

Mr Joseph Sullivan: ...river, and now we have strengthened the law, but I have discovered a new form of complaint. Only two or three weeks ago I had a complaint from a village that the public authority was running the sewage in its raw state into the river. I do not object to rivers like the Tweed being purified, but attention should first be paid to industrial centres in order to guard the health of the people,...

Orders of the Day — Depressed Areas (Development and Improvement) Bill. (3 Dec 1934)

Mr Thomas Griffiths: ...before the commissioner when he comes down to Wales. Some of them have been suggesting the extraction of oil from coal in the Blaenavon and in the Abersychan districts, some schemes of drainage and sewage, allotments, afforestation and piggeries. Some one suggested—and I think that this would appeal to the hon. Lady the Member for the Sutton Division of Plymouth (Viscountess...

Supply.: Department of Health for Scotland. (14 Jul 1936)

Mr John Train: ...of Scotland which could be made suitable for housing if there were a proper water supply and proper drainage. The Commissioner for the Special Areas referred to an expenditure of £1,250,000 for sewage purification. For that class of work we do not require bricklayers or the skilled workmen of any other trade, but unskilled men who are now largely unemployed, and such men should be...

PUBLIC HEALTH (DRAINAGE OF TRADE PREMISES) BILL. [Lords.] (27 May 1937)

Mr David Quibell: ...of streams in rural areas. I can find nothing in the Bill, however, which will remedy what I consider to be the worst feature of pollution. In certain rural districts not far from my own area, sewage is disposed of on the banks of the River Trent. There is no other method of disposal. It has to be carried there in the night, dumped On the banks of the river in order that the tide shall...

Orders of the Day — Rural Water Supplies and Sewerage Bill: Clause 1. — (Government contributions towards expenses of local authorities for rural water supplies and sewerage.) (8 Jun 1944)

Mr Evelyn Walkden: ...authorities around London are not able to dispose of their dry sludge on account of vested interests or organisations which will not help them out of their difficulties. I would mention the big sewage plant of the West Kent Sewerage Board, near Dartford. They were able to do a fine job of work in disposing of the sewage over a vast area, but their accumulation of dry sludge presented them...

Kinmel Bay, Denbighshire (Housing Estate) (18 Jul 1944)

Mr David Quibell: ...to build would be a great thing. It might have been a beautiful, healthy place and, with proper development and planning, could have been wonderful. The fundamental thing was to get an adequate sewage disposal scheme. In every one of these hundreds of houses the only drainage is a little man-hole with a cover, and the sewage has to be emptied out on to the little gardens. From 1930 to...

Orders of the Day — Coal Situation (24 Jul 1946)

Mr Harold Macmillan: ...." On other occasions he relapses into what the Attorney-General, if he were here, would no doubt call "the language of the gutter." Then we have those elegant phrases about "impudence," "cheek," "sewage" and "disinfectants." That mood is pure, unadulterated Hyde. However, there is a certain attraction in this very uncertainty. Sunshine and showers alternate, as on an April day, and are...

Orders of the Day — State of the Nation (7 Aug 1947)

Mr Meredith Titterington: ...to be special pleading, it is nevertheless stating the case for a cooperative effort from the wool textile industry. The wool textile industry, which covers the whole field of operations from the raw materials, to wool combing, distribution and marketing, is in a position to render a very great contribution towards the export drive. Before the war, we outstripped all our competitors in the...

Orders of the Day — Food Hygiene (31 Oct 1949)

Mr Thomas Skeffington-Lodge: ...is not adequate. I will admit that it is not possible by law to compel people to cook ducks' eggs for at least eight minutes; nor is it possible to stop butchers wrapping up corned beef next to raw carcase meat. It is possible, however, to set an example in premises under one's own control, and on this point I shall have something to say to my right hon. Friend in a few minutes. Education...

Orders of the Day — Housing, Slough (5 Apr 1950)

Mr Fenner Brockway: I wish to take advantage of this Adjournment to draw the attention of the House to the housing situation in the borough of Slough. I do this in no parochial spirit. I do not make any claim for Slough which would be unfair to other towns or to the countryside. I appreciate the difficulty of the Government in procuring the raw materials and the labour for housing, and in using them effectively....

Orders of the Day — River Irwell (Pollution) (18 Apr 1950)

Mr Anthony Greenwood: ...is one which I find still more appalling than the first. It is: There are no fish in these rivers (apart from a very occasional tributary), no insects, no weeds, no life of any kind except sewage fungus, nothing but chemicals and any dirt which cannot be put to profitable use. Sewage effluents (and, being usually very good, they are the most encouraging feature of the appalling situation)...

Rivers (Prevention of Pollution) Bill (27 Nov 1950)

Sir Richard Nugent: ..., which have been most valuable and, I should say, essential to them in carrying out their work, are absolute powers to prevent any effluent, to deal with any effluent which can be called sewage, or is injurious or noxious, and which is being discharged into a stream. In practice, of course, they have set up standards. They have had some reference to the standards laid down by the Royal...

Defence (5 Mar 1952)

Mr William Williams: ...was decided upon. It was decided upon 12 months ago, as we have already been told, at a time of panic. According to the White Paper itself, we did not have then, and we do not have now, the raw materials, the machine tools, the manpower or, indeed, the economic resources that will enable us to fulfil that original programme. It may be that at the time the programme was devised—I was not...

Orders of the Day — Central African Federation (29 Apr 1952)

Mr Stanley Evans: ...very much that all concerned with these negotiations will bear that in mind. I want to turn to another aspect of the matter which is not generally discussed. I do not know whether, like sex and sewage, it is considered improper, but it seems to me to be very relevant to this discussion. In this country where we British have three meals a day and full employment, our ability to remain...

River Witham (Pollution) (21 Jul 1952)

Mr Joseph Godber: ...to welcome them from that area. I implore my hon. Friend the Parliamentary Secretary to do everything he can to stop this very serious pollution which is going on, both from the factory and the sewage. I am thinking of places in my constituency, where I am trying to get sewerage schemes going so that we can prevent this raw sewage from polluting the river. I would have liked a very much...

Oral Answers to Questions — Local Government: Sewerage Development, Newcastle-under-Lyme (21 Oct 1952)

Mr Edward Mallalieu: Is the Minister aware that raw sewage comes up from the drains into the dwelling-houses in Winter-ton in my constituency, and that £2,000 worth of work would be sufficient to put it right, and will be not give the greatest possible consideration to that proposal?

Welsh Affairs (22 Jan 1953)

Mr Daniel West: ...about water supplies and sewerage? In 1951, in the last Report of the Labour Government, they were able to say: During the year under review 44 grant-aided schemes of water supply, sewerage and sewage disposal costing £594,993 were completed, and 66 estimated to cost £1,633,338 were begun.Since the commencement of the Rural Water Supplies and Sewerage Act, 1944, 107 grant-aided schemes...


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