Results 181–200 of 300 for genetics databases

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Written Answers — Home Department: Databases: Genetics (9 Jul 2007)

Stephen Crabb: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what recent estimate she has made of the number of people whose DNA is held on the national database who have committed no offence.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (20 Jun 2007)

Mark Pritchard: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) UK and (b) foreign nationals are recorded on the National DNA Database.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (15 Jun 2007)

Sylvia Hermon: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many (a) adults and (b) children resident in Northern Ireland appear on the national DNA database; how many do not have any convictions or cautions in each case; and if he will make a statement.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (11 Jun 2007)

Nick Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many individuals' records are held on the National DNA Database, broken down by (a) age, (b) ethnicity and (c) the police force which provided the profile.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (7 Jun 2007)

Nick Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what forecast he has made of the number of individuals who will have profiles on the National DNA Database in the next (a) one, (b) two and (c) five years, broken down by ethnicity.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (7 Jun 2007)

Nick Clegg: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what plans he has to remove replicate samples from the National DNA Database.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (7 Jun 2007)

Tom Watson: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department how many people work in the National DNA Database Quality Team; what specialist training they receive; and if he will make a statement.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (4 Jun 2007)

Natascha Engel: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department what personal and biometric data is collected by police when an arrest is made; and how much of this data is retained when a suspect is released without being charged.

Written Answers — Home Department: Genetics: Databases (10 May 2007)

David Davis: ...arrested in each financial year since 1995 who were (a) under 16, (b) 16 to 18, (c) 19 to 21 and (d) over 21 years at the time of their arrest had their DNA profiles added to the National DNA Database; and how many have subsequently had those profiles removed from the database in each case.

National Dna Database (15 Nov 2006)

Ian Gibson: ...country made in 2001 allowed us to take DNA samples from individuals who had not necessarily been charged and had only been cautioned. That enabled us to do this kind of bar coding and put it on a database. Some 3.4 million individuals—a small fraction of the population, but growing all the time—are on a database, which is accessible to many different people. Is there a benefit in...

Written Ministerial Statements — Home Department: National DNA Database (16 Feb 2006)

Andy Burnham: ...Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) to Chief Officers on the consideration of applications for the removal, in exceptional circumstances only, of DNA and fingerprints from the respective databases. There has been considerable recent interest in the policy and operation of the National DNA Database (NDNAD), particularly in relation to juveniles and those arrested but subsequently...

Written Ministerial Statements — Home Department: National DNA Database (5 Dec 2005)

Andy Burnham: On transition of the Forensic Science Service (FSS) from Trading Fund status to GovCo the Government will retain control of the National DNA Database (NDNAD). It is recognised to be a world leading crime intelligence database, and a key national criminal justice asset. The standard setting and oversight of the National DNA Database, ensuring quality and integrity of the service, will be...

Identity Cards Bill (15 Nov 2005)

Baroness Kennedy of The Shaws: ...a change in the relationship between the citizen and the state—to review it annually does not actually demand very much. I, too, have concerns about security and the security of the centralised database. For many who object to the scheme, the issue is not the need to have an identity card but the creation of an extraordinary central database, its potential for expanding and the uses to...

Forensic Sciences (18 Oct 2005)

Fiona Mactaggart: ...role in the detection of crime. The Home Office has been working with the major stakeholders, including the Association of Chief Police Officers, the Association of Police Authorities, the Human Genetics Commission and the custodian of the database to ensure that changes are carried out to improve the strength and transparency of oversight. The management of the national DNA database will...

Scottish Parliament written answers — NHS Waiting Times: NHS Waiting Times (7 Jun 2005)

Andy Kerr: ...day case care. Only acute specialties (those specialties primarily concerned in the surgical, medical and dental sectors) are included in SMR01 returns. Due to the transactional nature of central databases, i.e., records are continually being added, information relating to the most recent period should be regarded as provisional and could be subject to minor future change. The...

Human Tissue Bill (22 Jul 2004)

Lord Jenkin of Roding: ...the Primary Immunodeficiency Association; the Tuberous Sclerosis Association; the Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths; the British Heart Foundation; the Motor Neurone Disease Association; the Genetics Interest Group; and, I have no doubt, others. I was reminded of the enormously important role that those bodies played in leading this House to a sensible conclusion on the legislation...

Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia (10 Mar 2004)

Baroness Finlay of Llandaff: ...my remarks to the importance of research and the hope that it holds. I am proud to declare my interest as vice-dean of University of Wales College of Medicine, which is at the very forefront of genetic research in this field. Currently, about 536,000 people across Britain have moderate or severe cognitive impairment. The incidence rises steeply with age. Estimates are that the overall...

Genetics (24 Jun 2003)

Lord Jenkin of Roding: ...—if that has not happened already—to the report of the Select Committee on Science and Technology of this House, on which I had the honour to serve when the committee inquired into human genetic databases, under the chairmanship of the noble Lord, Lord Oxburgh. One subject that the noble Lord, Lord Warner, has not mentioned in the Statement—it may be in the White Paper but I have not...

Biobank (3 Jul 2002)

John Hutton: .... Participants will be free to withdraw from the study at any time. If a person wants to withdraw from the research programme, all their personal information and samples will be removed from the database. I should like to make one point very clear to my hon. Friend. The Biobank will be used for research purposes only. Any data released to research workers will be properly anonymised and...

Written Answers — Health: Genetic Information (10 Jun 2002)

Hazel Blears: The United Kingdom's Biobank will conform to all relevant ethical and legal guidelines regarding consent, confidentiality and use of human tissue, biological samples and genetic information. Also, as recommended in the report on research databases published recently by the human genetics commission ("Inside Information—balancing interests in the use of personal genetic information"),...


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