Results 101–120 of 300 for covert human intelligence sources

Did you mean cover human intelligence source?

Public Bill Committee: Terrorism Prevention and Investigation Measures Bill: Clause 1 - Abolition of control orders (23 Jun 2011)

James Brokenshire: ...was made well by the right hon. Member for Wythenshawe and Sale East—but there is a broader context. We need to look at the roles of what might be described as disruption, of surveillance and intelligence, of prosecution and of deportation, and at how all those strands fit together cohesively to deliver on the safety and security of our citizens. We are debating what might be considered...

Written Answers — Home Department: Police: Surveillance (7 Jun 2011)

James Brokenshire: Guidance is contained in Chapter 4 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 statutory code of practice on the use of covert human intelligence sources. A copy is available in the House Library.

Public Bill Committee: Protection of Freedoms Bill: New Clause 5 (17 May 2011)

James Brokenshire: ...in some of the existing commissioners. We can take the interception of communications commissioner as an example of the specialist knowledge required. The commissioner provides oversight of the intelligence agencies and the law enforcement authorities by keeping under review their use of interception powers and their powers to acquire communications data. The commissioner’s powers to...

Written Answers — Home Department: Police (16 May 2011)

James Brokenshire: Authorisations under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (“RIPA”) may be given for the deployment of covert human intelligence sources such as police undercover officers both inside and outside the UK. Members of foreign law enforcement agencies acting as undercover officers may also be authorised under RIPA in support of domestic and international investigations....

Public Bill Committee: Protection of Freedoms Bill: Schedule 7 (12 May 2011)

James Brokenshire: ...for district judges in Northern Ireland in relation to their consideration of local authority authorisations and notices for the acquisition of communications data and authorisations for the use of covert human intelligence sources and directed surveillance under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000. New sections 23A and 32A of the 2000 Act address both excepted and reserved...

Public Bill Committee: Protection of Freedoms Bill: Clause 38 (26 Apr 2011)

James Brokenshire: ...on the formal review that the hon. Gentleman and the hon. Member for Gedling seek, particularly as other work is ongoing elsewhere. The hon. Gentleman may be aware of concerns about the use of covert human intelligence sources. The Independent Police Complaints Commission, the Serious Organised Crime Agency and Her Majesty’s inspectorate of constabulary reviews into recent covert human...

Public Bill Committee: Protection of Freedoms Bill (22 Mar 2011)

Robert Buckland: ...to the area of your competence with regard to communications. As you have acknowledged, the proposed reforms would require judicial approval for not only that, but directed surveillance and covert human intelligence sources. I am going to put it simply: would it not be an anomaly if we left the area that you cover out of any proposed reforms to the other two areas in which there is...

Public Bill Committee: Protection of Freedoms Bill (22 Mar 2011)

...’s attention to how lax the current self-authorising regime is—indeed, the current head of the Association of Chief Police Officers has called for prior judicial authorisation for the use of covert human intelligence sources by the police. When you have the police asking for prior judicial authorisation and better regulation of the use of these powers, it should be incumbent on the...

Police: Protest Groups — Question (12 Jan 2011)

Baroness Neville-Jones: ...in this area is a very important element. I must say that the police agree. The chief constable of West Midlands himself has said that the line is not to be crossed between infiltration to gather intelligence and the agent provocateur. He is quite right. As to the codes of practice, the legal framework is provided for by regulations contained in the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act....

Written Answers — Home Department: Surveillance (21 Oct 2010)

Rehman Chishti: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department if she will bring forward legislative proposals to make the unlawful use of (a) intrusive surveillance, (b) directed surveillance and (c) covert human intelligence sources a criminal offence.

Bill Presented — National Insurance Contributions Bill: Anti-Slavery Day (14 Oct 2010)

Damian Green: ...inform the House of the future direction of trafficking policy. We all agree that trafficking is an appalling crime which treats people as commodities and exploits them for criminal gain. Combating human trafficking is a priority for the Government; what we have been discussing today is how it can best be achieved. We are seeking to improve the United Kingdom's response to the wider threat...

Written Answers — Work and Pensions: Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission: Surveillance (29 Mar 2010)

Nick Hurd: ...Peterborough of 23 February 2010, Official Report, column 456W, on the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission: surveillance, whether the Commission and its predecessor have made use of (a) covert human intelligence sources and (b) private investigators.

Written Answers — Treasury: Revenue and Customs: Surveillance (2 Mar 2010)

Stewart Jackson: ...the Chancellor of the Exchequer how many (a) requests and (b) approvals for authorisation for HM Revenue and Customs to carry out (a) property interference, (b) intrusive surveillance and (c) covert human intelligence sources there have been in each of the last five years.

Delegated Legislation: Investigatory Powers (23 Feb 2010)

That the draft Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Surveillance and Property Interference: Code of Practice) Order 2010, which was laid before this House on 5 January, be approved. -(Mrs. Hodgson.) Question agreed to. Motion made, and Question put forthwith ( Standing Order No. 118(6)), That the draft Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Human Intelligence Sources: Code of...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Human Intelligence Sources: Code of Practice) Order 2010 (23 Feb 2010)

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Human Intelligence Sources: Code of Practice) Order 2010

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Human Intelligence Sources, Matters Subject to Legal Privilege) Order 2009 — Motion of Regret (23 Feb 2010)

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Covert Human Intelligence Sources, Matters Subject to Legal Privilege) Order 2009 — Motion of Regret

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) Order 2010: Motion to Approve (23 Feb 2010)

Baroness Hamwee: ...that originally nine organisations had the right to use them; now, many hundreds do. This month, the Child Maintenance and Enforcement Commission will be given powers, including the power to use covert human intelligence sources. The list of organisations-admittedly, they have very important functions-now able to take their own decisions about purposes which entitle them to seek...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) Order 2010 (23 Feb 2010)

Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) Order 2010

Bill Presented — Climate Change (Sectoral Targets) Bill: Investigatory Powers (9 Feb 2010)

...of Investigatory Powers (Communications Data) Order 2010, which was laid before this House on 5 January, be approved. That the draft Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Directed Surveillance and Covert Human Intelligence Sources) Order 2010, which was laid before this House on 5 January, be approved.

Bribery Bill [HL]: Third Reading (8 Feb 2010)

Lord Bach: ...this reply is quite lengthy, but the importance of this matter demands that the Government put out their case as best they can. The Bill could have been silent on the whole question of whether the intelligence services and the Armed Forces have to engage in conduct that would constitute a Clause 1 or Clause 2 offence. Indeed, this is the approach adopted in many other countries. We...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.