Results 41–60 of 300 for covert human intelligence sources

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Written Answers — Home Office: Informers (27 Apr 2017)

Steve McCabe: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions there have been as a direct result of information gained by police forces from covert human intelligence sources in the last 12 months.

Written Answers — Home Office: Police: Informers (20 Feb 2017)

Brandon Lewis: ...of crime, particularly in serious organised crime and terrorism investigations. The use of informants is subject to strict authorisation controls and oversight framework, as set out in the Covert Human Intelligence Sources Code of Practice. The College of Policing’s Code of Ethics also makes clear that officers who authorise or perform covert policing roles must keep in mind at all...

Written Answers — Home Office: Fracking: Protest (24 Nov 2016)

Baroness Williams of Trafford: ...has not given specific guidance to the police on the use of undercover officers in anti-fracking groups. This is an operational matter. However, the police use of undercover officers and other covert sources is regulated by Part 2 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) and subject to guidance in the Covert Human Intelligence Sources Code of Practice published under...

Policing and Crime Bill - Committee (2nd Day) (Continued) (26 Oct 2016)

Baroness Harris of Richmond: ...suspects; and to conduct road checks for indictable offences. Another example is the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000, or RIPA. It contains: powers to authorise the use and conduct of covert human intelligence sources; powers to authorise the direct surveillance of an individual; and powers to acquire communications data. Another example is the Terrorism Act 2000, which...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Report (1st Day) (11 Oct 2016)

Earl Howe: My Lords, the noble Lord, Lord Janvrin, has again spoken persuasively on the importance of making clear that privacy is at the heart of the Bill. The amendment tabled in his name, on behalf of the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament, serves to reinforce that point and provide greater clarity. He will be pleased to know that, on that basis, I am happy to support it. Included in...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (4th Day) (5 Sep 2016)

...,(b) the retention, accessing or examination of communications data or secondary data,(c) equipment interference,(d) access or examination of data retrieved from a bulk personal dataset,(e) covert human intelligence sources,(f) entry or interference with property.(2) The Investigatory Powers Commissioner must only notify subjects of investigatory powers under subsection (1) upon completion...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (1st Day) (Continued) (11 Jul 2016)

Earl Howe: ...about the relevant safeguards provided in existing legislation. In response, the Government tabled amendments in the House of Commons strengthening the protections in the Bill for journalists’ sources. The amendment passed on Report places an extremely strong test in the Bill where a public authority seeks to use communications data to identify or confirm a journalist’s source. This...

Written Ministerial Statements — Prime Minister: Annual Report of the Chief Surveillance Commissioner and Report on the use of Section 94 Directions by the Interception of Communications Commissioner (7 Jul 2016)

David Cameron: ...Commissioner on his oversight of directions issued under section 94 of the Telecommunications Act 1984. Both reports provide rigorous and independent oversight and scrutiny of the use of covert investigatory powers. The Chief Surveillance Commissioner, the Right Honourable the Lord Judge, was appointed in July 2015 to keep under review public authority use of covert surveillance, covert...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Second Reading (Continued) (27 Jun 2016)

Lord Lester of Herne Hill: ...Lord, Lord West of Spithead, and others, welcome this Bill as a significant step towards providing a much-needed clear and transparent basis for the investigatory powers used by the security and intelligence services and law enforcement authorities. I also welcome the safeguards that it contains, some of which need to be strengthened. We must await the expert assistance of David...

Investigatory Powers Bill: Notification by the Investigatory Powers Commissioner (6 Jun 2016)

..., (b) the retention, accessing or examination of communications data or secondary data, (c) equipment interference, (d) access or examination of data retrieved from a bulk personal dataset, (e) covert human intelligence sources, (f) entry or interference with property. (2) The Investigatory Powers Commissioner must only notify subjects of investigatory powers under subsection (1) upon...

Investigatory Powers Bill: General duties in relation to privacy (6 Jun 2016)

Victoria Atkins: ...just how important this is. I am conscious of the time, so I will make just one more point about new clause 1. Subsection (1)(e) sets out that people are to be told if they have been informed on by covert human intelligence sources. That means informants, in everyday language. The new clause, if passed, would help criminal gangs to find out who is informing on them—and, presumably, to...

Written Ministerial Statements — Northern Ireland Office: Report by Lord Carlile of Berriew C.B.E., Q.C. on the National Security Arrangements in Northern Ireland (12 May 2016)

Theresa Villiers: ...are always well briefed and exceptionally well informed on all material issues. During 2015 I met with the Northern Ireland Policing Board (NIPB), and also Alyson Kilpatrick, the Independent Human Rights Advisor to the NIPB. The NIPB can feel assured that the Human Rights Advisor is well able to discharge her duties in respect of national security. I met the Police Ombudsman for Northern...

Public Bill Committee: Investigatory Powers Bill: Notification by Intelligence and Surveillance Commissioner (3 May 2016)

‘(1) The Intelligence and Surveillance Commissioner is to notify the subject or subjects of investigative or surveillance conduct relating to the statutory functions identified in section 196, subsections (1), (2) and (3), including— (a) the interception or examination of communications, (b) the retention, accessing or examination of communications data or secondary data, (c) equipment...

Public Bill Committee: Investigatory Powers Bill: Warrants: notification by Judicial Commissioner (3 May 2016)

New clause 18—Notification by Intelligence and Surveillance Commissioner— “(1) The Intelligence and Surveillance Commissioner is to notify the subject or subjects of investigative or surveillance conduct relating to the statutory functions identified in section 196, subsections (1), (2) and (3), including— (a) the interception or examination of communications, (b) the retention,...

Public Bill Committee: Investigatory Powers Bill: Power to issue warrants to law enforcement officers (21 Apr 2016)

John Hayes: ...Committee when it considered them. It would be curious—I put it no more strongly than that—if we were suddenly to focus on this and make a considerable change to existing practice. The use of covert human intelligence sources under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 is also well-established. The current practice is subject to the chief surveillance commissioner, who has...

Public Bill Committee: Investigatory Powers Bill: Power to grant authorisations (14 Apr 2016)

Joanna Cherry: Will the Solicitor General accept that there have been severe concerns lately about what turned out to be rather destructive surveillance activities by the Metropolitan police in relation to covert human intelligence sources? Does he agree that it is highly unlikely that such practices would have occurred if there had been a system of prior judicial authorisation, rather than internal...

Public Bill Committee: Investigatory Powers Bill: Examination of Witnesses (24 Mar 2016)

Chris Farrimond: I am also responsible for covert human intelligence sources for informants. Of course, we know their identity, but we guarantee their anonymity. That is precisely what we do, although their identity is known within the agency. It is difficult to predict exactly how this could possibly impact, but if we are guaranteeing anonymity, that means we will not—

Scottish Parliament: Undercover Policing (6 Jan 2016)

Roderick Campbell: ...obtained as result of duplicity on the part of offices of the state, save in carefully monitored circumstances. As I understand it, one of the problems is that the now defunct national public order intelligence unit was engaged in intelligence gathering and that the judiciary did not have the opportunity of reviewing any authorising officer’s decision, rationale and justification for...

Written Ministerial Statements — Home Office: Undercover policing (16 Jul 2015)

Theresa May: ...and social justice campaigners. The inquiry’s investigation will include, but not be limited to, the undercover operations of the Special Demonstration Squad and the National Public Order Intelligence Unit. For the purpose of the inquiry, the term “undercover police operations” means the use by a police force of a police officer as a covert human intelligence source (CHIS) within the...


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