Results 1–20 of 200 for covert human intelligence sources

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Orders of the Day — Supply. (28 Apr 1932)

...filled with admiration for the versatility of the hon. Gentleman the Member for Don Valley (Mr. T. Williams). He deals with so many and such complex subjects, but I am sure, in spite of that, he is human enough not to have forgotten the agony which he must have suffered in making his own maiden speech. I hope he will forgive me if, in making my maiden speech, I do not attempt to reply in...

Orders of the Day — Prevention of Terrorism Bill (24 Oct 1983)

Mr Clive Soley: ...is turning Northern Ireland into a dustbin for terrorists. The feeling in Northern Ireland about this matter is immensely strong. Not only has the Northern Ireland Standing Advisory Commission on Human Rights rightly condemned this, but many other people do not see why it is all right for terrorists to walk the streets of Belfast but not all right for them to do so in Britain....

Bill Presented: Regulation of Investigatory Powers (9 Feb 2000)

...a Bill to make provision for and about the interception of communications, the acquisition and disclosure of data relating to communications, the carrying out of surveillance, the use of covert human intelligence sources and the acquisition of the means by which electronic data protected by encryption or passwords may be decrypted or accessed; to provide for the establishment of a...

Orders of the Day — Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (6 Mar 2000)

Jack Straw: ...and it is narrow in scope and subject matter. Those powers are the interception of communications; the acquisition of communications data; intrusive surveillance; directed surveillance; the use of covert human intelligence sources; and demands for decryption. They are all powerful weapons in the armoury of law enforcement agencies. In 1998, 52 per cent. of all heroin seizures resulted...

Scottish Parliament: Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (6 Apr 2000)

Des McNulty: ...the use of the powers in the bill. There has been a general welcome both for those safeguards and for the fact that we are bringing regulation in this area into line with the European convention on human rights. However, I will pick up on the question whether the bill should be dealt with at Westminster or at Holyrood, which is raised in Roseanna Cunningham's amendment. It seems to me that...

Clause 17: Exceptions to Section 16 (8 May 2000)

Jane Kennedy: These amendments all deal with the jurisdiction of the tribunal, but amendments Nos. 83 to 86 relate to the tribunal's jurisdiction in Scotland. The amendments would extend the tribunal's human rights jurisdiction to include any directed or intrusive surveillance, and any conduct or use of a covert human intelligence source, where any of these activities take place in Scotland. However, I...

Clause 29: PERSONS ENTITLED TO GRANT AUTHORISATIONS UNDER ss. 27 AND 28 (8 May 2000)

David Maclean: ...interesting morning in Committee when we considered clause 29, which deals with persons entitled to grant authorisations under sections 27 and 28—the sections covering directed surveillance and covert surveillance. We were innocuously going through the clause, and when we reached the part that stated that the people with the power would belong to "relevant public authorities", we saw...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (25 May 2000)

Lord Bassam of Brighton: .... It regulates six investigatory powers. Five of the powers are used already and the Bill will ensure that that use is regulated in accordance with the requirements of the European Convention on Human Rights. Although, strictly speaking, the sixth power is new, it arises only as a response to developments in technology. Technology has the potential to limit considerably the capabilities of...

Scottish Parliament: Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Bill: Stage 1 (14 Jun 2000)

Jim Wallace: For completeness I will continue, and then give way. Grounds for authorisation of covert human intelligence sources, set out in section 4(3), and for directed surveillance, set out in section 3(3), are: "(a) for the purpose of preventing or detecting crime or of preventing disorder; (b) in the interests of public safety; (c) for the purpose of protecting public health". I will say later how...

Security and Intelligence Agencies (22 Jun 2000)

Jack Straw: ...welcomes the Committee's involvement in many of the areas covered. My right hon. Friend the Foreign Secretary and I fully endorse its confirmation of the importance of continuing high-quality intelligence and security services for our country. Both to those involved and to the formulation of Government policy, reliable and timely intelligence will remain as important now as it has ever...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (28 Jun 2000)

Lord Bach: ...II which is, we think, genuinely welcomed by everyone. These are important provisions which will safeguard the use of these valuable investigative techniques by law enforcement authorities, by the intelligence services and by many public authorities carrying out statutory enforcement functions. As part of the development of policy, we have been able to identify all those public authorities...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (28 Jun 2000)

Lord Bach: ...is in the Bill and its effect. I shall also try to answer his questions. The provision at Clause 26(3) would allow for authorisations under this Bill to be given for the use of surveillance or covert sources where some or all of the activity was to take place outside the UK. That can be seen to be directly relevant in the case of an intelligence agency with a remit to operate abroad, but...

Restrictions on Authorisations Extending to Scotland (28 Jun 2000)

...in subsection (3); (c) authorises conduct of a person holding an office, rank or position with any of the public authorities so specified; (d) authorises conduct of an individual acting as a covert human intelligence source for the benefit of any of the public authorities so specified; or (e) authorises conduct that is surveillance by virtue of section 45(4). (3) The public authorities...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (12 Jul 2000)

Lord Cope of Berkeley: ...Lord's response. This problem will clearly be extended, mostly it seemed from what the Minister said, to public departments which do not realise that they fall under the relevant sections of the Human Rights Act. Considering all the publicity there has been about the Human Rights Act-- there have even been training sessions for lawyers on the Human Rights Act--there are still public...

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (13 Jul 2000)

Lord Bassam of Brighton: ...Government's point of view with regard to the codes, we published the four preliminary drafts on Monday. They cover interception of communications and accessing communications data, surveillance, covert human intelligence sources, and investigation of electronic data protected by encryption, and so on. They are in the public domain and we look forward to receiving comments from industry....

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (19 Jul 2000)

Lord Bassam of Brighton: ...judicial authorisation. We suggest that access to communications data, even at the top end of the scale, is not more intrusive than directed surveillance--a point that I made before--or the use of covert human intelligence sources as set out in Part II of the Bill. Quite rightly in our view, those Part II provisions have been approved by both Houses of Parliament without the introduction...

Scottish Parliament: Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3: Section 1 — Conduct to which this Act applies (7 Sep 2000)

Ben Wallace: .... I am grateful to members of the Justice and Home Affairs Committee, who listened to some of my past experiences. I have tried to clear up the grey area that will result from the bill: when is a source not a source, and when is the use of a covert human intelligence source actually just the use of a regular contact, who volunteers information to the police or develops a relationship with...

Scottish Parliament: Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3: Section 3 — Authorisation of directed surveillance (7 Sep 2000)

Jim Wallace: ...and on section 5(3), which gives ministers powers to add or remove relevant public authorities for the purposes of sections 3 and 4—that is, for the authorisation of directed surveillance or covert human intelligence sources. That power is subject to affirmative resolution, so Parliament would have to approve the resolution before any group could be added. It is interesting to note that,...

Scottish Parliament: Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Bill: Stage 3: After section 5 (7 Sep 2000)

Jim Wallace: ...resolved and that resolution is reflected in this group of amendments. Amendment 34 provides for officers of the Scottish Crime Squad to authorise directed surveillance and the conduct and use of covert human intelligence sources. It also provides that the Scottish Crime Squad will be able to use intrusive surveillance by applying to the chief constable of the relevant police force for the...


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