Results 1–20 of 200 for cervical screening in the 'Written Answers'

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (27 Feb 2012)

Paul Burstow: “Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer”, published on 12 January 2011, makes clear the important role that cervical screening plays in preventing cervical cancer. The strategy also notes that some groups and communities are not accessing cancer screening services. To encourage all eligible women aged 25 to 65 to attend routine cervical screening we are working with NHS Cancer...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (30 Jun 2015)

Jane Ellison: We were fully supportive of Cervical Screening Awareness Week from 15 to 21 June 2015. It is important that women realise that cervical screening can prevent cervical cancer and we encourage women of screening age (25 to 64) to make an informed decision to attend when invited for screening. Departmental officials regularly meet with Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust to discuss cervical...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (9 Sep 2009)

Mike O'Brien: The cervical screening age range will be a standing item on the agenda of meetings of the independent Advisory Committee on Cervical Screening, which reviews all new research to assess its significance to the cervical screening programme. NHS Cancer Screening programmes maintain an on-line database of literature relating to cervical screening, and publish "Cervical Screening: Literature...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer: Learning Disability (15 Jun 2015)

Jane Ellison: The NHS Cervical Screening Programme in England offers screening to women aged 25 to 49 every three years, and women aged 50 to 64 every five years. Women aged over 65 should only be screened if they have not been screened since age 50 or if they have had recent abnormal results. The NHS Cervical Screening Programme provides support leaflets for carers of women with learning disability...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer: Lancashire (5 Mar 2012)

Paul Burstow: The information requested on screening is not available for the Lancashire area as a whole. Information showing the numbers of women screened through the national health service cervical screening programme by primary care trusts (PCTs) in Lancashire for the years indicated is shown in table 1. Information showing the number of deaths where cervical cancer was the underlying cause for women...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer (7 Jan 2015)

Jane Ellison: The coverage of cervical screening amongst women between the ages of 25- 29 currently sees 60% of women in this age group accepting their invitation. The NHS Cervical Screening Programme is working in collaboration with the study STRATEGIC (Strategies to increase cervical screening uptake at first invitation) to identify interventions to increase uptake in this age group in Greater Manchester...

Written Answers — Health: Cancer (22 Jun 2006)

Rosie Winterton: In May 2004, the international agency for research on cancer, part of the World Health Organisation, concluded that organised and quality controlled cervical screening can achieve an 80 per cent. reduction in the mortality of cervical cancer. Women aged 25 to 49 should be screened no more than every three years, and women aged 50 to 64 no more than every five years. This is in line with...

Written Answers — Health: Smear Tests (23 May 2002)

Yvette Cooper: Cervical screening is not a test for cancer but for abnormalities which, if left undetected and untreated, may develop into cancer. The national computerised call/recall system for cervical screening invites women aged 20 to 64 for a free cervical screening test every three to five years. The figures are not available in the form requested. 83 per cent. of eligible women were screened at...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Screening (24 Jun 2002)

Hazel Blears: The coverage of the cervical screening programme is assessed as the proportion of women resident in a health authority who have had a screening result at least once in the last five years. Coverage has always been used as an indicator of quality in the cervical screening programme, as well as highlighting inequalities. Coverage rates for cervical screening are not collected by ethnic group...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer (6 Mar 2013)

Anna Soubry: “Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer” (January 2011) makes clear the important role that cervical screening plays in preventing cervical cancer. The strategy also notes that some groups and communities are not accessing cancer screening services. To encourage all eligible women aged 25 to 64 to make the important decision to attend routine cervical screening, we are working with NHS...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer (9 Mar 2015)

George Freeman: A leaflet sent out with every invitation for cervical screening provides women with clear, honest and balanced information about the benefits and limitations of cervical screening in order to ensure women are able to make an informed decision as to whether to have a cervical screening test or not. Improving Outcomes: A Strategy for Cancer (January 2011) makes clear the important role...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer (9 Oct 2006)

Rosie Winterton: The national health service cervical screening programme (NHSCSP) was introduced in 1988 and women aged 25 to 64 are invited for a free cervical screening test every three to five years. Women over 65 are invited if any of their previous three tests were not clear or if they have never been screened. Cervical screening is not a test for cancer but for abnormalities which, if left undetected...

Written Answers — Department of Health and Social Care: Cervical Cancer: Screening (31 Oct 2018)

Steve Brine: Public Health England (PHE) is currently developing a campaign that will promote uptake of cervical screening. The campaign is scheduled to launch in 2019. The campaign will include activity that is targeted specifically at women from minority ethnic groups. PHE advises the National Health Service on how to deliver screening programmes. The service specifications include standards relating...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (1 Sep 2008)

Ann Keen: NHS Cancer Screening Programmes is commissioning a £250,000 Improvement Foundation project to tackle the falling participation of women aged 25 to 35 in the NHS cervical screening programme. Five primary care trusts have been invited to participate in this project. Information on the proportion of women aged 25 to 35 participating in the NHS cervical screening programme in 2008 is not yet...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer (26 Feb 2015)

Jane Ellison: The National Health Service cervical screening programme is based on informed choice. A leaflet sent out with every invitation for cervical screening provides women with clear, honest and balanced information about the benefits and limitations of cervical screening in order to ensure women are able to make an informed decision as to whether to have a cervical screening test or not. ...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer: Health Education (29 Jan 2016)

Jane Ellison: Ministers welcome and support cervical cancer prevention week. We are fully supportive of the work Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust does to raise awareness of cervical cancer and the importance of cervical screening for eligible women. The Department and Public Health England will be promoting cervical cancer prevention week on social media. Information on cervical screening is available on the...

Written Answers — Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (18 Jan 2011)

Paul Burstow: There are no plans at this time to extend cervical screening in England to women who are aged under the age of 25, or who are under 25 and have given birth. In England, cervical screening currently starts at age 25 years in line with the recommendations of the World Health Organisation and the independent Advisory Committee on Cervical Screening (ACCS). The Department is committed to ensuring...

Written Answers — Department of Health and Social Care: Cervical Cancer: Screening (26 Feb 2019)

Steve Brine: The National Health Service will remain the primary provider for cervical cytology screening in England and cervical screening remains part of the General Medical Services contract. In November 2015, the UK National Screening Committee recommended that human papillomavirus (HPV) screening should replace the currently used liquid based cytology test as the primary screening for cervical...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer (4 Feb 2015)

Jane Ellison: The NHS Cervical Screening Programme promotes local public health service initiatives to encourage women to attend cervical screening, such as the Manchester campaign entitled “You Wouldn’t Miss…” – see the link below: http://goodhealth-manchester.nhs.uk/test/cancer/cervicalCanc erPosterCampaign.html Cervical screening rates have been identified as a key issue by the...

Written Answers — Department of Health: Cervical Cancer: Screening (3 Feb 2017)

David Mowat: The NHS Cervical Screening Programme invites all eligible women aged from 25 to 64 years to make an appointment to be screened at their local general practice surgery. General practices are encouraged to provide convenient screening appointments for all women registered with their practice when they are due to be screened. Cervical screening may also be available at some contraception and...


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