Results 61–80 of 1000 for unparliamentary

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (14 Apr 2008)

William Hay: ...they had committed.” — [Official Report, Vol 29, No 4, p174, col 2]. The comments did not refer to one specific Member. I refer the Member to the Hansard report. I remind Members that it is unparliamentary to accuse other Members of telling lies. I dealt with the matter at the time, and I could not have been any clearer. I have considered the report of the debate, and I do not consider...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (11 Oct 2016)

Alex Attwood: ...McCartney be invited to correct the Hansard report? Thirdly, will you review Mr McCartney's comment during that debate, when he referred to a Member being economical with the truth? That could be unparliamentary, depending on context and circumstances. I ask you to consider those three matters and make a ruling on whether Mr McCartney's comment was unparliamentary.

Points of Order (18 Sep 2003)

Mr George Foulkes: On a point of order, Madam Deputy Speaker. "Erskine May" describes certain words and phrases as unparliamentary. Hon. Members sometimes use such words in the heat of the moment and it is difficult for Mr. Speaker, you and your colleagues to keep track of that. Earlier today, the hon. Member for Buckingham (Mr. Bercow) used the term "hypocritical sophistry". I think that that is pretty near...

Orders of the Day — Prices and Incomes Bill (25 Jun 1968)

Sir Harmar Nicholls: I do not dissent from the points put, and hope that you will be able to give further consideration to the matter, Mr. Speaker. But I was pained to listen to the unparliamentary language in which the hon. Member for Ebbw Vale (Mr. Michael Foot) put his point to you. I do not believe that it should be allowed to stay on the record just because the words which I believe unparliamentary were...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Presiding Officer’s Business (22 Feb 1999)

Lord John Alderdice: ...it clear that when Members ask me to look at matters I will look at them. However, my immediate response is that Members from the Gentleman’s own side of the House were recently accused of using unparliamentary language when they, by implication, made certain links between Sinn Féin and IRA. I made it clear that whatever one thought about such remarks, they were not unparliamentary and...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business: Speaker’s Ruling:  Unparliamentary Language (24 Nov 2009)

William Hay: ...Members to raise bogus points of order to try to get at the basis of that ruling. In making my ruling, I want to refer to points of order that were raised during last week’s sitting on the use of unparliamentary language. Two points of order referred to remarks made by Mr Mervyn Storey and his use of the terms “hypocrisy” and “hypocrite”, and I am aware that, on a previous...

Prayers: House of Commons (Conduct of Members) (18 Feb 1972)

Patrick Cormack: ...1st February, you made a solemn and significant statement in which you referred to recent breaches of parliamentary conduct. You said: What I now want to make clear is that it an hon. Member uses unparliamentary language or acts in an unparliamentary manner and when ordered to refuses to withdraw or desist, I will not hesitate to act in accordance with the Standing Orders."—[OFFICIAL...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (21 Apr 2009)

William Hay: ...yesterday’s debate on the loss of nursing posts, Mr Basil McCrea and Mr Danny Kennedy raised points of order in relation to remarks made by Mr Easton. Members can be in no doubt by now that it is unparliamentary to accuse another Member of telling lies or deliberately misleading the House. I have considered the remarks that were made by Mr Easton and the exchanges that then took place...

Northern Ireland Assembly: First Minister (9 Oct 2000)

Lord John Alderdice: ...in all circumstances, save where the Speaker finds himself having to reprove people there. That is not very common. Secondly, I urge Members, including the Member who was on his feet, to beware of unparliamentary language. Thirdly, Members should note that when they use the word "you" they are making reference to the Speaker. I have been accused of many things inside and outside this...

Points of Order (18 Oct 1990)

Dr Jack Cunningham: ...draft of the Official Report. Since they were uttered, I have had the opportunity to consult "Erskine May", which on page 381 makes it clear that the imputation of false or unavowed motives is unparliamentary language. I assume that the rules on unparliamentary language apply even to the Prime Minister. I hope that you, Mr. Speaker, can advise me how that totally dishonest and abusive...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (19 Jan 2009)

William Hay: ...of the standards that are expected during any debate in the House. Members should know by now that direct, unsubstantiated allegations of criminal behaviour against another Member are highly unparliamentary. The comments that were made directly about the Minister of Education fell short of the moderate or good temper that is expected in the House and were, at least, very discourteous....

Northern Ireland Assembly: Presiding Officer’s Business (1 Mar 1999)

Lord John Alderdice: ...raised a question as to whether remarks about the Orange Order and the RUC made by Mr Mitchel McLaughlin at the sitting on 16 February 1999, recorded on page 105 of Volume 2 of Hansard, were unparliamentary. At the time I said that, however objectionable Mr Dodds or others might have found the remarks, I did not believe them to be unparliamentary or a breach of privilege. Having...

Public Bill Committee: Justice (Northern Ireland) Bill: Clause 46 - Functions of Chief Inspector (7 Feb 2002)

Derek Conway: ...occurred in columns 226 and 227, with the word ''pejorative''. However, I took the precaution of going to the Library to check the Oxford English Dictionary, and I found that the word was not unparliamentary. It is not a word that the Minister could be required to withdraw. It may be considered hurtful, but it is not considered unparliamentary. With regard to the Minister's observations...

Education Cuts (29 Mar 1995)

Miss Betty Boothroyd: ...they—that is, Ministers—cannot tell the truth. I know that the House can get over-excited in major debates of this kind and that words are used which, when read on the page, appear clearly unparliamentary. While accepting what the hon. Member said after my second intervention, I think it would clear the matter up if he would formally withdraw the two brief unparliamentary phrases to...

Adjournment (Whitsuntide) (1 Jun 1965)

Mr Emanuel Shinwell: ...the Recess, nor even a reference to a statement by the Foreign Secretary on Vietnam and San Domingo. This is sheer hypocrisy. I will not use the word "humbug", because I understand that it is unparliamentary, although I would use it if it were not unparliamentary. What is all the bother about? The Government moved a Motion which means that we want to adjourn on 4th June until 14th...

Leader of the Opposition (Statement) (13 Feb 1985)

Mr Bernard Weatherill: .... I do not intend to go into the exact reasons why that was, but yesterday I was watching very carefully, as the House would have expected me to, to ensure that no accusations of lying or any other unparliamentary words were used. It was not my judgment that the words which were used—"I do not believe it" or "I do not believe you"—were an unparliamentary expression. That is an...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (9 Feb 2009)

William Hay: ...they are not covered by parliamentary procedure. If Members make direct allegations of criminal behaviour against other Members, when there have been no convictions, I will rule such allegations as unparliamentary. I say to the whole House that Members who sit in another House will know that. Erskine May, on page 440, is absolutely clear on the subject of direct allegations against other...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly business (29 Jun 2009)

Declan O'Loan: ...June on the report of the Committee on Standards and Privileges on the Northern Ireland Assembly code of conduct. The first relates to the accuracy of comments, and the second relates to the use of unparliamentary language. In relation to the point of accuracy, page 31 of the ‘Northern Ireland Assembly Companion’ states: “A good precedent has been established by other Members that,...

Northern Ireland Assembly: Assembly Business (5 Nov 2001)

Lord John Alderdice: ...Sir) James Kilfedder, whether or not it was in order for a Member to "act the eejit". The Speaker’s ruling was that "The Member is not acting." He did not, however, rule that the word "eejit" was unparliamentary. Regarding the use of the words "shut up", it might have been better if the Member, on a point of order, had asked if the Speaker would rule that the speech was repetitive or...

Points of Order (25 Apr 2016)

John Bercow: ...order, in a moment. Let me first respond to the initial point of order and to the hon. Gentleman’s response to it. I am at a disadvantage for the very simple reason that if anything offensive or unparliamentary was said by the hon. Gentleman—I emphasise the word “if”—I did not hear it. If I had heard what I have subsequently been told was said—which I have no intention of...


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