Results 461–480 of 500 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Baroness Deech

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (12 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I will try not to detain the Committee too long but there are some important issues here. These amendments actually call into play Clause 46, which in a way is in the wrong place. They are about the fundamental purposes of birth registration. We are talking about a birth registration in these clauses, not a record of the legal relationship between the adults. It is the welfare of the child...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (12 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I was proposing to include a reference to Clause 46 in the forthcoming larger group beginning with Amendment No. 68.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (12 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Maybe we can speak plainly about this and scrape away some of the difficulties of a lengthy clause, to which my noble friend Lady Finlay referred. It grieves me to disagree even with her probing, because I so admire her leadership in medical matters. When sperm is taken from a man before his death, he is able to consent; his mere co-operation with the procedure is consent. There is no more...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (12 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: The idea put before us is a good one in principle but I think it has been oversold for three reasons. We already have the Human Genetics Commission, we have the Nuffield Council on Bioethics, we have reports from the Wellcome Institute and we had excellent reports from all our professional and learned societies. About 10 years ago, when Dolly the sheep was born and cloning and stem cells...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: We agree on the responsibility to society, but many of us see it differently. The liberalisation, if it can be called that, of in vitro fertilisation treatment is continuing. It has continued apace since 1990 and it would be best if the law were left untouched. It gives clinicians the discretion to do as they see fit at the time. The compromise drafted by the noble and learned Lord, Lord...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I am all in support of the village, which of course consists of members of both sexes. Further research has been done by the child psychiatrist Professor Sturge on the effect on children of being brought up in same-sex families and there is much more research out there that I hope your Lordships will consider. More amendments are to come and I do not wish to take up your Lordships' attention...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Time does not allow me to pay full tribute to the richness and depth of this debate. I am sure that we are all grateful to all those who have participated in it with their particular knowledge. I will touch on a few points. The Bill tells fathers that they are unnecessary. This has symbolic value. If the Government had not decided to remove this provision, clinics, parents and children would...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I—

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: The work of Professor Golombok is frequently cited, but she is one alone in this country with a very small sample. Her work is vastly outweighed by the work of many others, whom I obviously cannot cite endlessly. However, one example is the Department for Work and Pensions, which says: "Fathers and mothers matter to children's development. Father-child relationships ... have profound and...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I was not aware of having said that a child has a right to a father. I was only arguing for the existence of the current law, which states that the commission should take account of the child's need for a father—no more than that.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: moved Amendment No. 55: Clause 14, page 9, line 14, leave out paragraph (b)

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (10 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Your Lordships will know that the pre-legislative scrutiny committee that examined the Bill wanted to ensure that there were ethical principles in the law, preferably fixed by Parliament. There appeared to be very few ethical principles that the committee and its witnesses could agree on, but the one that I shall argue for is so basic that it is a litmus test of the ability of this nation to...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (4 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: May I make a small correction? I am not sure what would be the procedure under the Human Tissue Act. I do not believe that it is right for the Human Tissue Authority to be giving that permission. It would be better if we had the old system, whereby a child was made a ward of court and the judges gave permission. I do not know how the Human Tissue Authority would approach that.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (4 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: As I have said before, we live in a world of freedom of mobility. There is nothing to stop anyone going abroad to have a procedure that is limited or prohibited here. Indeed, the HFEA refused the Whitakers permission to have such a procedure. I understand that they had the procedure in the United States and it was successful. We have no control in that sense, but we live in a world of...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (4 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: No other field has been as extensively analysed by the lawyers as well as by the ethicists. The noble and learned Law Lords of this House gave a judgment in the case of the Hashmi family, who were the first family to be granted permission by the HFEA. Their little son Zain suffered from beta thalassemia major, which might be cured by umbilical cord blood. The HFEA gave permission and was...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (4 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I am sorry to say that I am not as familiar as I clearly should be with the definition there, but there are legal definitions of "best interests". In my view, looking back at decisions made in the past, it is very unlikely that a court would give permission for a major organ to be removed from a small child. At least that was the case in the past; the Human Tissue Act is new. In the...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (4 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: I support the amendment of the noble Baroness, Lady Finlay, for two reasons. Many of us who have worked in this field know that much of the drive for regulation and the fears about ethics come from the fact that 80 or 90 per cent of the work is private, with all the dangers that attach to it, in a field which has proved very lucrative. If much more of the work were carried out in the NHS we...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (3 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Before my noble friend reaches a conclusion, I shall add, on the welfare of the child, that at the moment the authority is very concerned about multiple births, with all the adverse consequences that they have for the health of the children. It went very far—some said too far—in counselling of all sorts. It keeps a register of the names of donor fathers and spent a great deal of time...

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (3 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Without naming names, I definitely recall that there was at least one Catholic—possibly more—serving when I was chair. Religion simply was never an issue.

Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill [HL] (3 Dec 2007)

Baroness Deech: Perhaps I may add an eminently evident and obvious point—that many members of the authority were social workers, nurses, parents, teachers and others with similar concerns. Others were experts in computing, which is obviously important, while others were councillors or men of the cloth, as I said. All those professions were taken account of, and that work is by no means a soft option. The...


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