Results 161–180 of 3500 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Baroness Hollis of Heigham

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I am looking at the particular words. Amendment No. 56 concerns exceptionally high housing costs, travel-to-work costs, illness or disability costs. That includes all the items that are currently in the existing formula. Therefore, we are back to where we were. We then add to that payments made by the parent with care or non-resident parent to support an elderly or invalid relative. Yes,...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: No, and I hope that noble Lords opposite may share this philosophy. Basically, we are reducing the amount of average assessment that the non-resident parent will pay. On average, that sum will come down from approximately £38 or £39 to approximately £30 or £31 per week. We are making that sum less. We are leaving more in the pocket with which to meet those additional costs. We are not...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Amendment No. 199 would remove from Schedule 9, which lists repeals and revocations in the 1991 Act, the provision to repeal Section 46B(3).

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Amendments Nos. 71, 72, 73, 74 and 75 relate to Clause 10. To set this group of amendments in context I would like to outline, briefly, the purpose of this clause. Clause 10 sets out clearly the child support decisions which carry a right of appeal. It provides the framework for appeals and tribunal procedure which will be, as now, specified in detail in regulations. In a reformed child...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: On the contrary, I believe those statements to be right: that the courts were a form of lottery; they failed to deliver money to children; they were adversarial and inequitable. On the same day, cases could be heard of two people on the same income in which one person was asked to pay £5 while the other was asked to pay £50 on an income of £100. If the noble Earl thinks that that is...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: If the noble Earl asks me which system I believe to be in the best interests of a child where a father wishes to reduce his maintenance payments, under the noble Earl's theory he can either go to court and slog it out in an adversarial setting saying, "This is how little I value my child; I want to pay less maintenance"--because that is the nature of an adversarial court setting;...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendment No. 79: Page 14, line 4, leave out ("that person's") and insert ("the child's"). On Question, amendment agreed to. Clause 15, as amended, agreed to. Clause 79 [Tests for determining parentage]: [Amendment No. 80 not moved.] Clause 79 agreed to. Clause 80 agreed to. Schedule 8 agreed to. Clause 16 [Disqualification from driving]:

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendments Nos. 81 to 83: Page 14, line 18, at beginning insert ("in England and Wales"). Page 14, line 19, at end insert ("or 38"). Page 14, line 21, leave out ("a magistrates'") and insert ("the"). On Question, amendments agreed to.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: He will be in Amsterdam, so there is not much chance of that.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The proposition that tagging should be considered for non-payment was put forward by Mr Eric Pickles in another place. That would criminalise the matter and make it a criminal offence instead of a civil one. It would mean having someone tagged in front of his children for failing to pay maintenance.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I hope that I can help my noble friend. I wonder whether he is aware that in March 1997 the noble Baroness, Lady Blatch, introduced a Bill on this matter. There are already pilot schemes in Norfolk and Greater Manchester which allow magistrates to withdraw driving licences for sentences other than those associated with driving. I hope that in the light of those comments my noble friend will...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I gather that my noble friend does not approve of this measure. Let me go back a step. All of the changes to child support that we are proposing are to ensure that maintenance flows to children in a way which is as conducive as possible to mediation, negotiation and good relationships between the parents. That in turn will benefit the children. We want compliance and we are hoping to get...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: On the contrary, the threat of this should help increase compliance. One will lose one's licence only if one fails to pay maintenance. We want people to pay their maintenance. Enforcement kicks in only when people do not voluntarily pay their maintenance. If I may say so, the noble Lord's point is back to front. This possible penalty would kick in only when someone has failed to comply. We...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Perhaps I can respond to the noble Lord's point and then perhaps he can intervene. I shall of course give way if he wishes. One has to ask what remedies are currently available. My noble friend is right, it is mostly men who are non-resident parents; therefore, by definition, it is mostly men who fail to pay maintenance liabilities. Any penalty which insists that men--that is, fathers--pay...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Of course.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: It is too late to engage in that debate tonight.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I am willing to, but I am not sure that my other noble friends are. To argue that men are unfairly treated by the courts in determining who gets residence is to put to question the whole of the developments in social policies since the Children Act 1989. I accept that there may be cases where there should be greater contact between them. There are no saints or sinners in this story. I am not...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I have listened very carefully to my noble friend. I simply disagree with him. He argues that it is improper. I argue that it is proper. That is simply a juxtaposition of different perspectives. What we have at the moment is a range of penalties if a non-resident parent fails to pay his maintenance. They include a fine. They include a distraint order. We know that a distraint on goods is...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Possibly, but the point is that imprisonment is one of the penalties for contempt of court. If the CSA has taken someone to court for failing to do something, the courts currently have that power to do so. I ask the Committee: which is better for the child; which is better for the parent with care; and which is better for the father--that he should have his driving licence taken away or that...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My noble friend uses the word "fascist". A lot of sanctimonious nonsense has been talked during this debate. I really will not accept this language--"Hitler", "This is fascist", and all the rest. What we are saying is that magistrates will have the option of another sanction in their repertoire which will not be a failure, as fines are--which simply add to the debt which is already causing...


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