Results 81–100 of 3500 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Baroness Hollis of Heigham

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (17 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, it is interesting that the noble Earl is pushing me on that point. At the moment, I understand that something like 130,000 community sentences per year are passed. Something like 30,000 per year are breached. Some of those sentences are for quite serious offences, but they are being breached. As a result, we want to ensure that such young offenders--they are often young and mainly...

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the powers we inherited in the March 1997 Fraud Act do not allow us to compel local authorities, even if that were desirable. However, 272 local authorities have now adopted the scheme; most of the rest should do so shortly.

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I am happy to confirm again that there is little or no evidence of fraud in relation to disability benefit. A great deal of error occurs in payment primarily because, fortunately, people get better and, as a result, they should be in receipt of less disability benefit. However, they do not always report the change in circumstance and therefore continue to misdraw that benefit. The...

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the noble Baroness is absolutely right. It is very difficult to put a figure on fraud that has not yet been uncovered. One has to multiply it by the number of weeks that it would have continued had one not intervened and stopped it. More generally, we believe that benefit fraud runs between £2 billion and £4 billion a year and if, we include cases where there is mild suspicion of...

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the noble Baroness has put her finger on one of the reasons that so many local authorities have been slow to take up the "Do not re-direct" scheme. It means that they have to separate their housing benefit mail from the rest of their correspondence. But, basically, with the aid of government grant--indeed, this is entirely funded by the DSS, with £350,000 a year being spent on new...

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, they come from the local authority's housing section and will have a "return to sender" address printed on the front. However, local authorities print their own envelopes and, therefore, every set of envelopes from each local authority can be different. There is no standard envelope in use across the system. Local authorities take responsibility for this because they have different...

Housing Benefit Fraud (18 Apr 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I suppose so. At present, every local authority has its own envelope which may contain different types of information. But, given the fact that this is a matter of concern to your Lordships, I shall ask my colleagues to mention this suggestion at the next meeting with local authority associations to ascertain whether this is an avenue that should be pursued. However, once all local...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, I beg to move that the House do now resolve itself into Committee on this Bill. Moved, That the House do now resolve itself into Committee.--(Baroness Hollis of Heigham.)

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: New Clause 2 seeks to extend the definition of a child, for child support purposes, by raising the upper age limit for child support liability to the date on which full-time education up to degree level ends. Under the proposed new clause children who leave school before that stage would receive child support until their 17th birthday or until they complete full-time education including a...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I wonder why the noble Earl thinks that because we are continuing the status quo on child support we are somehow excluding for the first time children who would otherwise receive maintenance under his proposed amendment from access to higher education? I could take his point if we were changing the situation as regards the age of the child, but that is the existing situation and we are not...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The noble Lord has more intimate conversations with my noble and learned friend the Lord Chancellor than I do.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, Amendments Nos. 3 and 4 seek to place on the face of child support legislation a new framework of obligations within which a reformed child support scheme would operate, emphasising the role of both parents in raising children. Amendment No. 3 seeks to set out in the Bill the wider responsibility that both parents have to their children beyond the immediate obligations to maintain...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: No. This is a matter for the Lord Chancellor's Department, which, as I said, is currently conducting an internal review. That review may well lead to a wider review, which could go out to consultation. Therefore, even if it were a sensible procedure, the timetabling of all this would not be permitted. In any case, such major issues should certainly be tabled in Committee. From everything that...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: On the contrary. To my certain knowledge we have distributed thousands of copies, including the abbreviated versions of both the Green and White Papers. Indeed, we have received 1,500 responses, followed by many seminars and discussions. I should be most surprised if as many parents were as familiar with the context of a Bill, or of a parliamentary statute. Their solicitors might be, but they...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: As clearly explained by the noble Lord, Lord Higgins, this amendment increases the time limit within which a parent with care must notify the CSA if she wants to continue as a voluntary client when she leaves benefit before a maintenance calculation is made. Clause 1 provides the basis for maintenance calculations. It substitutes a new Section 11 dealing with the rules for maintenance...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I believe that that might be true under the existing system. I hope that it will not be true under the future system. Given the simplicity of our arrangements under the future system, even if an application were brand new as opposed to a continuation of one where we had to obtain new information about the ex-partner's circumstances, we would expect to have that information within days and the...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: It is "departures".

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: "Departures" belong to the existing scheme, "variations" to the new one.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Both these amendments relate to parliamentary scrutiny of variations. Amendment No. 8 will require the Secretary of State to seek the approval of both Houses of Parliament for any changes he wishes to make to the nature and qualifying criteria of the grounds on which he will consider a variation from the normal child support maintenance calculations. I recognise the noble Lord's concerns to...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendment No. 9: Page 2, line 34, leave out from beginning to ("and") in line 39.


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