Results 181–200 of 3500 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Baroness Hollis of Heigham

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: --that the provision will be effective, and will therefore bite and will actually make men pay. I am sorry to see that. Amendment No. 84 would mean that magistrates would have to inquire into whether the non-resident parent needed his licence to buy food, take children to school or attend for medical treatment. We consider that requiring the courts to inquire into whether the non-resident...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: As I understand it, it is a civil penalty. We are talking about civil penalties. That is one of the virtues of the provision. We are trying not to cross the line between civil and criminal jurisdictions. These are the procedures that the magistrates' court will have in mind. It is not the CSA but the courts that will decide the matter. The court will have to be satisfied that the non-resident...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: As far as I am aware, it deals with both civil and criminal matters. I am receiving support from elsewhere for the point that I have just made, but if I have misled the noble Lord I am happy to write to him about the nature of the jurisdiction. Parking fines are the subject of civil and not criminal offences. Some of the debts handled by magistrates' courts are not criminal matters....

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Perhaps I may dispute that. If he does not have a driving licence, the alternative would be for the magistrates to consider committal to prison. So it is not true that the person holding a driving licence would be more disadvantaged than someone who does not.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I still do not understand what I regard as the back to front nature of the argument. A person is either actively seeking work or in a job. He fails to pay his maintenance. On the example given by the noble Lord, he knows that a driving licence is essential for his continued job. He will say to himself, "I am being asked to pay child maintenance. I do not want to pay child maintenance. If I do...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The noble Earl seems to be suggesting that the CSA will take away the driving licence. It is the magistrates' courts which will do so if that is the sanction they propose. It will be they who will hear the case. So this notion that the individual will not be able to put his case to a magistrate and have those circumstances taken into account is simply not true.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: No, because the CSA's assessment falls on his income and the number of children. By definition, it is not that he cannot pay but what priority he puts on that payment over other items of expenditure.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I do not accept the noble Earl's point.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The proposals were introduced in March 1997 by the noble Baroness, Lady Blatch, on behalf of the noble Lord's government. Why is he now so bad mouthing proposals introduced in the dying weeks of his last government?

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I cannot tell the Committee about the results of pilot schemes. However, I wanted to ask the noble Lord since when it has been the usual stance of an Opposition Front Bench only a couple of years after departing government to take no responsibility whatever for the actions of his own government just three years before. I have heard about irresponsibility, but that is to put a new meaning to...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: The evaluation report of the pilot scheme, which, given that it was introduced by the previous government, the previous administration might have been interested in following through, was published at the beginning of March. The report shows that its use was not particularly high partly because one of the areas in which it was piloted was Norfolk. There, magistrates tended not to use it and...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Perhaps I may write to the noble Lord. This is a Home Office matter. I gave evidence that the previous administration was quite comfortable to use the removal of driving licences for offences that were not related to driving. That appeared to be news to the noble Lord.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendment No. 85: Page 14, line 42, leave out from beginning to end of line 8 on page 15 and insert-- ("(6) In this section "the court" means-- (a) in England and Wales, a magistrates' court; (b) in Scotland, the sheriff."). On Question, amendment agreed to. [Amendment No. 86 not moved.]

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendments Nos. 87 to 90: Page 16, leave out lines 19 to 26. Page 16, leave out lines 42 to 44. Page 17, line 4, leave out ("40A(10)") and insert ("40A(8)"). Page 17, line 4, at end insert-- ("( ) In section 164(5) of the Road Traffic Act 1988 (power of constables to require production of driving licence etc.), after "Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988" there shall be inserted ", section...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: moved Amendment No. 91: Page 17, leave out lines 9 to 18. On Question, amendment agreed to. Clause 17, as amended, agreed to. [Amendment No. 92 not moved.] Clause 18 [Financial penalties]:

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Amendment No. 93 relates to the provision which will enable the CSA to impose a discretionary financial penalty of up to 25 per cent of the maintenance owed where payments are unreasonably late or missed altogether. Penalty amounts will be set at the discretion of the Secretary of State and will be used by the agency basically as a tool in negotiations. The aim is to persuade non-resident...

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: I do not understand the noble Earl's question because any power must be operated reasonably. Therefore, there is no effect of the word "absolute". When the noble Earl asked me the second question about judicial review, I was able to tell him that that right is not lost.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Because we believe that it is right to protect the authority of the Secretary of State in that situation.

Child Support, Pensions and Social Security Bill (8 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: Because, as far as I am aware, that is consistent with the arrangements under the Social Security Administration Act, which we discussed earlier, as regards how the structures of decision-making, the workings of tribunals and so on are organised.

The Welfare State and the Elderly (9 May 2000)

Baroness Hollis of Heigham: My Lords, the measures flowing from the Green Paper Partnership in Pensions, together with those announced in the past two Budgets, demonstrate the priority that the Government have given to ensuring a decent income in retirement and improved quality of life for pensioners; hence our proposals for an earnings-linked minimum income guarantee for poorer pensioners now as well as for a state...


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