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Results 121–140 of 181 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Lord Parekh

Families, Community Cohesion and Social Action (28 Feb 2008)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, like many noble Lords who have spoken before me, I begin by thanking the noble Baroness, Lady Gardner of Parkes, and congratulating her on securing this debate. We all agree on the importance of social cohesion. We also share the widespread feeling that, for all kinds of reasons, social cohesion is weakening and that we should do something about it. This question is particularly...

Iraq (24 Jan 2008)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Fowler, for securing this debate and initiating it with considerable passion and eloquence. Many noble Lords have spoken about the situation in Iraq, and so I shall not go over it. Instead, I shall ask a slightly different question. Like some noble Lords, I strongly believed that the war on Iraq was thoroughly misconceived and would go down...

Africa: Conflict (13 Dec 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Alton of Liverpool, on securing this debate, and thank him for introducing it with considerable passion and understanding. Since other Peers have spoken about the consequences of conflict, which are well known anyway, I want to concentrate on, first, why conflicts occur and, secondly, what we should do about them. In discussing conflicts in...

House of Lords Bill [HL] (30 Nov 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, pending general consensus on the composition of the House and whether it should be 80 per cent or 100 per cent elected, we certainly need to tighten up the appointments system. In so far as the Bill of the noble Lord, Lord Steel, does that, I welcome it. I do, however, have four or five small and large reservations about how the Bill attempts to do so. First, the Bill suggests that...

Multi-cultural Britain (7 Jun 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Hastings of Scarisbrick, for introducing this debate with great passion and clarity. It is important to bear in mind that William Wilberforce had spent more than 20 years trying to abolish the slave trade. The Bill to abolish it was introduced by him and his colleagues 11 times and it failed each time with an increasing majority. In 1804, he...

Parliament: Waging War (Constitution Committee Report) (1 May 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Holme of Cheltenham, and his colleagues on the Constitution Committee for this excellent report. It is timely, closely argued, politically balanced and backed up by an impressive body of views from experts in the field. The Government's response is disappointing, not so much because it rejects the recommendations of the report but because it...

Iraq (22 Feb 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Hurd, for introducing this extremely important debate on Iraq. That Iraq is in a total mess needs no repetition from me. No one in that country feels safe. Militias and armed gangs roam the streets, and schools and universities function only intermittently. Shias and Sunnis, who despite their differences had lived together for centuries, fear...

Poverty and Governance (11 Jan 2007)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I too thank the noble Baroness, Lady Whitaker, for initiating this debate so eloquently. I also congratulate the Government, especially DfID, on producing what I take to be an extremely imaginative and interesting White Paper. If I may part company with what my noble friend Lord Lea of Crondall was saying, it is far more than a collection of undergraduate, or even postgraduate,...

Corporate Manslaughter and Corporate Homicide Bill (19 Dec 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I compliment the Government on introducing this long-overdue Bill. In the past few years many public and private bodies have caused death or considerable harm to their employees or the general public, and have not been successfully prosecuted or have got away with nothing more than a fine. For example, in the case of the Paddington train crash, 31 people died and Thames Trains got...

NHS (7 Dec 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I, too, thank the noble Lord, Lord Colwyn, for initiating this very important debate. I would sum up my answer to his question about the state of health of the NHS in one sentence: it is undergoing some convulsions but its life is not in danger. The NHS has made considerable progress while the Labour Government have been in charge of it. If one looks at certain obvious statistics...

Northern Ireland: Integrated Schools (17 Jul 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I thank the noble Baroness, Lady Blood, for introducing the subject with considerable information and passion. I want to begin by making a general point. In all divided societies, schools always face a paradox. On the one hand, a lot is expected of them by way of healing the wounds and divisions that characterise divided societies. At the same time, their capacity to do so is...

Child Welfare Services (22 Jun 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I, too, congratulate the noble Lord, Lord Giddens, on arranging the debate and initiating it with authority and compassion. As he rightly pointed out, we have in this country one of the highest rates of child poverty and child abuse. No subject could be more important. The noble Lord concentrated on child poverty. After all, since he set the question, he is free to interpret it in...

Schools: History Teaching (5 Jun 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Luke, for initiating this very important debate, and for talking about it with great conviction and learning. No subject could be more important than this one. History is a record of society's collective memories, and a story of the formation of its identity. How history is taught is therefore vital in helping us to understand and define...

Churches and Cities (19 May 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I thank the most reverend Primate the Archbishop of Canterbury for securing a debate on this extremely important subject and introducing it with characteristic wisdom and erudition. I am struck by the quality of the debate and by the way in which it has been formulated. I am struck particularly by the fact that this kind of debate has not taken place in many of the religious...

Economic Migration (EUC Report) (11 May 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Wright of Richmond, for introducing the two reports with wonderful lucidity. I want to concentrate on the first report, which is on migration. I want both to endorse the report and to expand it a little in certain directions which it intimates but does not fully pursue. But before I do that I want to warn the committee about the likely Daily...

Medical Research (11 May 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I thank my noble friend Lady Hayman for initiating this extremely important debate and congratulate the noble Baroness, Lady Fritchie, on her splendid contribution to it. I also compliment the Government on supporting a variety of important initiatives in medical research. I have in mind the Department of Health's document Best Research for Best Health. I also have in mind the idea...

Universities: Research and Development (27 Apr 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the noble Lord, Lord Patten of Barnes, for introducing this extremely important and timely debate. I want to introduce a cautionary note. There is an increasing tendency to redefine the nature and role of the university almost entirely in economic terms. We are constantly told that the job of the university is to do research and that the research should aim at...

Christianity and Islam (23 Mar 2006)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I begin by thanking the right reverend Prelate the Bishop of Rochester for initiating this extremely important debate. I can think of very few people in our country who know the two religions as well as he does. The relationship between Christianity and Islam is one of the most important issues of our time. Sometimes it is referred to directly, sometimes it is simply alluded to....

Honour Killings (15 Dec 2005)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I thank the noble Lord, Lord Russell-Johnston, for this extremely important debate on what is on all accounts an unacceptable and abominable practice. When we talk about honour killing it might be useful to spend a minute or two trying to understand what it entails. We would all agree that honour killing is killing that is motivated by, or legitimised in terms of, a sense of honour....

Clinical Academic Staff (1 Dec 2005)

Lord Parekh: My Lords, I, too, thank my noble friend Lord Turnberg for initiating this very timely and important debate with characteristic understanding and passion. The decline in the numbers of clinical academic staff is striking and also worrying. As my noble friend pointed out, since 2000 there has been a 12 per cent drop in the number of clinical academics, amounting to as high as 42 per cent among...


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