Results 181–200 of 3000 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Baroness Featherstone

Orders of the Day: Schedule 14 — Repeals (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Thank you. Another lunacy is that the Home Secretary would have imposed mergers disabling many police forces for a substantial period at a critical time in this country's security.

Orders of the Day: Schedule 14 — Repeals (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: If the Minister will forgive me, I did not say that forces had been disabled, but that there was the potential for them to be disabled if the merger had gone forward. If we want joined-up police forces, we must make them into partners, good neighbours and allies, by sharing information and best practice, and perhaps by restructuring commissioning of any gaps in service. In private industry,...

Orders of the Day: Schedule 14 — Repeals (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I am grateful, to you, Mr. Deputy Speaker. I apologise for sitting down too soon. Lords amendment No. 71 concerns intervention in a failing police force. When a police force is failing, people will indeed want to be protected by Government intervention to ensure that they are safe and have a police force that delivers. There is no dispute about that. However, although the Government talk of...

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Liberal Democrat Members are not concerned about conditional cautions—we support and approve of anything that moves towards rehabilitation or reparation—but about the introduction of punitive cautions, particularly in the form of financial penalties. The Government's proposals mean that punishments will be issued on the spot, circumventing proper judicial procedure. That will lead to a...

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: If the Solicitor-General gives me time, I will elaborate. I was referring not to prosecutors but to the people who may be arrested. Lastly, the purpose of conditional cautions may be transmuted from the original purpose—that is, to offer the criminal the chance of not having to go to court on condition of changing their behaviour. For a Government who are so keen on changing antisocial...

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I apologise, Madam Deputy Speaker. The Government's pay-and-go policies let those who can afford it off the criminal hook, as they can pay not to have a criminal record, which cannot be right.

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: No, but the point about going to a magistrates court is that there is a whole other purpose involved—that the public can have confidence that the right person is convicted and it is publicly demonstrated that justice is being done. At present, we just have the arresting officer's say-so, in effect. Following on from issues to do with discrimination between the rich and the poor, we also...

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I am simply saying that a fine is punitive, and if someone can afford to pay that is well and good, but if someone comes from a deprived background they are less likely to be able to pay. The rush to summary justice risks losing the purpose of changing behaviour. The clause as it currently stands sets out the right to give conditional cautions with the sole objective of punishing the...

Orders of the Day: Clause 5 — Standard powers and duties of community support officers (24 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: The proposal to merge the prisons inspectorate and create a combined inspectorate rightly caused great furore. My noble Friends in the other place made a cogent case against the proposal, which we have not been allowed to do in this place because the Government prevented debate by not allowing adequate time on Report. That was a shameful avoidance of proper scrutiny in the House. The...

Business of the House (26 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Haringey happily provides statutory support for a high number of asylum seekers, as do other local authorities. However, funding support—for example, for the placement of unaccompanied children—does not remotely meet the actual costs, so may we have a debate on the available Government grant for the provision of statutory services to asylum seekers?

Orders of the Day: Clause 13 — Designation of alcohol disorder zones (30 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Over the past couple of years, the Liberal Democrats have called for a levy on big late-night venues to help pay for policing and the other costs of alcohol-related disorder. Therefore, we welcome the principle of alcohol disorder zones, because the scheme implements our "polluter pays" policy. We had some concerns about the issues in relation to the action zones and the tarring of the...

Orders of the Day: Clause 1 — Drinking banning orders (30 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I will not detain the House for long on this group of amendments. I very much welcome the amendments made in the other place. With regard to drink banning orders, we repeatedly made the point in Committee that merely banning an activity cannot be the whole answer. If people are not to reoffend in the same manner, rehabilitation and education are necessary for them to learn the error of their...

Orders of the Day: Clause 23 — Using someone to mind a weapon (30 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: The amendments on increasing the sentence for carrying a knife or a bladed article in a public place are extremely significant. On Second Reading, my hon. Friend the Member for Winchester (Mr. Oaten), who is no longer in his place, pointed out that, while carrying a gun carries a tariff of seven years, carrying a knife carries a tariff of only two years, yet both items kill people. He asked...

Orders of the Day: Clause 23 — Using someone to mind a weapon (30 Oct 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: My hon. Friend makes a good point, which I will come to later. It is a shame that the Government could not bring themselves to vote positively on Opposition amendments at an earlier stage, but I am glad that the strengthened sentence for such a serious and prevalent criminal offence is now being introduced. It is important not just to have an appropriate maximum sentence but to put an end to...

Animal Welfare Bill (Programme) (No. 3): Clause 15 — Conditional cautions; types of condition (6 Nov 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Although the Government tabled some amendments in the other place to address some of the concerns of Opposition Members, we remain concerned that the proposals herald a shift in British justice, with the prosecution effectively setting the sentence. Another concern is that, under these proposals, criminals may be able to afford to buy their way out of a criminal conviction. The maximum fine...

Oral Answers to Questions — Leader of the House: Alexander Litvinenko (27 Nov 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Mr. Litvinenko was my constituent and a British citizen. What assurances can the Home Secretary give me that Mr. Litvinenko's death will be investigated without fear or favour and that diplomatic sensitivities with Russia will not prevent the full, fair and free findings of that investigation?

[Mr. Greg Pope in the Chair] — Terrorism (Detention and Human Rights) (7 Dec 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: Does the right hon. Gentleman agree that it was almost impossible for the House to condone the evidence that was put before it and that the use of the ricin case, in which the suspect was held for two days, was a bad example in terms of evidence given to us as a reason for granting 90 days?

[Mr. Greg Pope in the Chair] — Terrorism (Detention and Human Rights) (7 Dec 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I am pleased to speak in this debate on two such excellent reports. Terrorist attacks involve gross violations against the individuals who are killed or injured, obviously, and gross violations of the fundamental values of civilised democratic societies. We live in a world where terrorist attacks are a reality and we must adapt to the current climate. Some of the new terrorism powers, such as...

[Mr. Greg Pope in the Chair] — Terrorism (Detention and Human Rights) (7 Dec 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I thank the right hon. Gentleman for that helpful clarification. I turn now to the general subject of detention. The level of threat that we are informed we are facing is so great that I am sure no politician of any persuasion in the House of Commons would simply say that there can be no change to and no infringement of civil liberties, rights or freedoms. I have not found it helpful that we...

[Mr. Greg Pope in the Chair] — Terrorism (Detention and Human Rights) (7 Dec 2006)

Lynne Featherstone: I see the Minister shaking his head, but that probably was an accidental and not very brilliant example. My next example puts in a nutshell some of the difficulties that we face as Members of Parliament in representing our constituents. Into my surgery came Mouloud Sihali. He was tried and acquitted in relation to the Wood Green ricin plot, but it is clear that the authorities still suspect...


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