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Results 161–180 of 1000 for (in the 'Commons debates' OR in the 'Westminster Hall debates' OR in the 'Lords debates' OR in the 'Northern Ireland Assembly debates') speaker:Paul Goodman

Orders of the Day — Childcare Bill: New Clause 6 — Best Value: Code of Practice (9 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The Minister said a moment ago that she had not given us much comfort. I agree, and I shall explain why by returning to the figures. The key word that she used was "churn" and she said that there is a churning of places. She also said that matters had improved since December 2004. From 2003–04 to 2004–05, according to the parliamentary answer that the Minister kindly provided, 16,000 new...

Orders of the Day — Childcare Bill: Clause 1 — General Duties of Local Authority in Relation to Well-being of Young Children (9 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: My hon. Friend the Member for Bognor Regis and Littlehampton (Mr. Gibb) was making this point: when one attempts to reduce inequalities, one first attempts to bring up the standard of those who have fallen behind, but if one cannot do that, there is only one other option—bringing down the standard of those who are ahead.

Orders of the Day — Childcare Bill: Clause 1 — General Duties of Local Authority in Relation to Well-being of Young Children (9 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: It is simple: the law depends on the words in the Bill, which are "reduce inequalities". If it proves impossible to bring up the standard of those who are being left behind to those who have gone ahead, there is only one option, which is to bring down the standard of those who have gone ahead to those who have been left behind.

Orders of the Day — Childcare Bill: Clause 41 — The Learning and Development Requirements (9 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: Does the hon. Lady agree with the Daycare Trust, which in its comments on the Bill is worried that the Government's approach could lead to a "schoolification"—a new word—of early years provision for very young children?

Broadband (Rural Areas) (15 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: It is a pleasure to see you in the Chair, Mr. Jones. It is also a pleasure, for which I am grateful, to have the opportunity to introduce this debate on broadband in rural areas. On 8 March last year the Minister with us today—then the Minister for Rural Affairs—and the Minister for Energy and E-Commerce wrote a letter to all parish and town councils, headed "Partnership in rolling out...

Broadband (Rural Areas) (15 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The Minister anticipates a complimentary remark that I was going to make later about BT. He evidently thought that I might not get there. I cannot, of course, be definitive about the figures and say whether the percentage is 0.2 per cent., 2.0 per cent. or 2.4 per cent. The Minister is more likely than I am to have access to the figures. I want now to discuss possible solutions and present...

Broadband (Rural Areas) (15 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: When the Minister replies, I expect that he will emphasise the importance of infrastructure. My hon. Friend the Member for Kettering (Mr. Hollobone) is right to distinguish between what my hon. Friend the Member for Clwyd, West, refers to as the platform—that is, the platform on which BT provides the service—and the lines that might take the services to isolated people and relatively...

Broadband (Rural Areas) (15 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: Although the Minister is correct to urge those present not to run down rural areas, as he put it, is it not hard to be sure how many people and businesses in rural areas are not connected to broadband while we do not have a definitive figure? It is therefore hard to be sure of the scale of the problem, and we hope that the Minister can assist us in that respect.

Occupational Pensions (16 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: Since 1995, public sector pensions, including ours and Ministers' pensions, have become relatively more secure, but private sector pensions—partly because of the £45 billion tax on pension funds—have got relatively less secure. Given that context, does not the Secretary of State acknowledge that my constituents and others will greet with incredulity the Government's overriding the...

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The Chancellor said it as well.

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The hon. Gentleman appears to be under the misapprehension that the success of the economy depends on Labour or Conservative Governments. Will he acknowledge that the success of the economy depends on the strength of British business? The question is whether this Government are making things better or worse, and I shall address it when I wind up the debate.

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: It is a pleasure to respond to the second day of debate on the Budget, all of which I heard bar five minutes. I also spent two hours attending yesterday's debate, which was a great pleasure to listen to. I should like to respond to some of the points made in today's debate. The first Opposition speech was made by the hon. Member for Leicester, East (Keith Vaz)—who is not in the Chamber,...

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: I shall certainly give way to the hon. Gentleman. Perhaps he would like to explain why some of the money handed out to pensioners last year to help them with their council tax is not available this year.

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: If I am excited, I can assure the hon. Gentleman that that has nothing to do with the contents of his speech. On the climate change levy, we will introduce proposals at the next election. There are problems with it. That, I think, deals with him. Page 188 of this year's Red Book contains the equivalent table. The section headed "Building a fairer society" has shrunk to five measures. Perhaps...

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: No, I must make progress and let the Paymaster General in. In 2050, China's share of world trade is estimated to rise to 24 per cent. North America's is estimated to fall by 2 per cent. to 23 per cent. The EU's share is set to fall by almost half to a mere 12 per cent., so the choice is clear. Even to maintain our position—to keep up with North American rather than European Union growth...

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The hon. Gentleman has not been here for the whole debate, but if he will tell me whether he wrote the jokes in yesterday's Budget speech and what the timetable is for bringing public sector schools up to the standard of private sector schools, I shall give way.

Budget Resolutions and Economic Situation (23 Mar 2006)

Paul Goodman: The hon. Gentleman must be really slow. Of course we support the goal, but we want a timetable, which he did not give us. It is no wonder that when the Prime Minister needs support for real education reform—reform with a Conservative direction of travel—he has to rely on Conservative votes to get it through the House of Commons. The Chancellor will be pleased to hear that if the Prime...

Foreign Nationals (Deportation and Removal) (26 Apr 2006)

Paul Goodman: In today's Prime Minister's questions, we learned that the Prime Minister did not know a key fact when the Home Secretary offered to resign yesterday. The key fact is that 288 criminals were released after the Home Secretary became aware of the problem. Given that, how can the Home Secretary stay in post?

Part 7: Clause 13 — Rates (3 May 2006)

Paul Goodman: Will the hon. Lady tell the House what definition of "sparsely populated rural area" she proposes to insert into the Bill?

Part 7: Clause 13 — Rates (3 May 2006)

Paul Goodman: As the hon. Lady apparently has a definition of people in rural and sparsely populated rural areas, can she tell the House how many people would benefit from her amendment?


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