Results 1–20 of 10000 for michael give

Preamble (4 Feb 1919)

Mr Francis Mildmay: ...Throne, I beg to move, "That the Right Honourable James William Lowther do take the Chair of this House as Speaker." Let me first say how very greatly I appreciate the honour of being allowed to give expression to what I believe to be the unanimous wish of the House of Commons. I rise with some trepidation, for, in spite of long familiarity, with these surroundings, they seem almost...

Supply. — [7TH Allotted Day.]: Chief Secretary for Ireland. (3 Apr 1919)

Mr T.P. O'Connor: ...throw a badge of inferiority and exclusion on the majority of the Irish people who were Catholics and Nationalists. That, of course, was bad. That I think was one of the first things that began to give Sinn Fein some of the greatest strength which it ultimately attained. I now come to the next part of my statement. There have always been two conflicting methods by which Irish...

Agriculture.: Government Policy. (30 Apr 1919)

Mr Thomas Davies: ...or in the police force, or into the Post Office they get a good pension when they are incapacitated from work—and that counts for a lot—whereas if they stay upon the land no farmer is going to give them a pension, and they simply have to take the old age pension. From the labour point of view, therefore, to keep these men on the land, to keep them from crowding into the towns is to the...

Orders of the Day — Condition of Ireland.: Statement by MR. Macpherson. (14 May 1919)

Mr James Sexton: ...House who were sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered. You had J. F. Z. O'Brien a Member of this House, and he had been sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered. You had my dear old friend Michael Davitt, a convict from Portland and a prominent figure in this House. You had John Mitchell, who was also sentenced to death and exiled, returned for an Irish constituency, although you...

Orders of the Day — East India Revenue Accounts. (22 May 1919)

Colonel Josiah Wedgwood: ...read or write. Of these some 3,000,000 or 4,000,000 are going to get the vote, because out of the 5,000,000 who get the vote, 1,000,000 or 2,000,000 will be illiterate people. So that you are only giving the vote, roughly speaking, to a quarter of those who are able to read and write, and you are giving it to them on a property qualification. The working classes in Bombay, Cawnpore, and...

Orders of the Day — Government of India Bill. (5 Jun 1919)

Mr Edwin Montagu: ...the plan which I prefer, which I think essential, just as he prefers that of the local Governments. That is a question which can only be settled by discussion before the Joint Committee, and I give the assurance that this Committee will not only be perfectly free, but I will do my best to supply all evidence that they can possibly want. There are deputations of Indians and Europeans in...

Oral Answers to Questions — India.: Government of India Bill. (9 Jul 1919)

Colonel Charles Yate: 3. asked the Secretary of State for India whether, considering that it has already been announced that Sir James Meston, the finance member of the Viceroy's Executive Council, is coining home to give evidence on behalf of the Government of India before the Joint Select Committee on the Government of India Bill, and Sir Michael O'Dwyer, the late Lieutenant-Governor of the Punjab has already...

Oral Answers to Questions — India.: Government of India Bill. (23 Jul 1919)

Mr William Ormsby-Gore: Is it not a fact that Sir Michael O'Dwyer, who is one of the five heads of provinces referred to by my hon. and gallant Friend who signed the Report of the five dissentient provinces, is now in this county and is available to give evidence?

Orders of the Day — CONSOLIDATED FUND (No. 2) BILL. (7 Aug 1919)

...-government. Long before he was a Member of this House, according to the statements of his biographers, the first great inspiration he ever got in political life was from listening to a speech by Michael Davitt, and then, convinced all through his life, from probably his twenty-first year, of the righteousness of the Irish claim, he comes down easy and free and detached in 1919 and wrings...

Orders of the Day — GOVERNMENT OF INDIA (Re-committed) BILL,: Clause 3. — (Revised System of Local Government in Certain Provinces.) (3 Dec 1919)

Colonel Josiah Wedgwood: ...the best Governors for these new and responsible Legislative Assemblies. We want a different type from the administrator who is trained and bred in the Indian Civil Service and whose whole career gives him a bureaucratic colour. He administers and his subordinates obey, and he obeys his superior. It is a form of machinery which is admirable for the particular work that the Indian Civil...

Debate on the Address. (10 Feb 1920)

Mr Donald Maclean: I do not know what the public revenue was for 1920, but I can give it for the years 1915 to 1918. In 1915 it was £60,700,000; in 1916 £53,900,000—nearly £54,000,000; in 1917 it dropped to £34,500,000; and in 1918 it was £48,500,000. I suppose that the higher figure will produce a much higher result. Has any Chancellor of the Exchequer, in introducing his Budget and dealing with the...

Orders of the Day — War Emergency Laws (Continuance) Bill. (4 Mar 1920)

Sir James Macpherson: ..., battalions, and the competent military authorities. The other day I had sent to me a proclamation headed, "The Irish Republican Brotherhood," and this is the sort of thing they issued: We hereby give notice that from this time forward any trading directly or indirectly either in the licensed premises or shop of the said Michael Walshe shall he considered as Dealing with the Police, and...

Liquor Traffic Local Veto (Ireland) Bill. (12 Mar 1920)

Mr Peter Raffan: ...things to remain as they are, things will remain as they are. I may say that, in my own modest way, I have all my life been a strong supporter of self-government for the Irish people. My friend, Michael Davitt, who was one of the bravest of Irishmen, one of the ablest and most sincere supporters of the Irish cause in this House, gave me, I remember, as an illustration of the need for...

Orders of the Day — Supply. [4TH Allotted Day.]: Army Estimates, 1920–21 (Vote on Account). (23 Mar 1920)

Mr T.P. O'Connor: ...incursion, when the widow and family must have been in a state of both mental and physical collapse, showed a certain lack of consideration. I addressed some words which reflected, though I did not give my reasons, what I thought was one of the most serious factors in the situation at Cork—the feeling of almost universal morbid suspicion which reigns in that city; for certainly it is a...

Orders of the Day — CONSOLIDATED FUND (No.1) BILL.: National Expenditure. (24 Mar 1920)

Mr Thomas Davies: ...methods of checking the Treasury, has been neglected; Not one has been accepted, and that being so I really do think the House is not being treated with the consideration it deserves. When men have given of their best for a long period of two years, in order to see how things can be improved, and have made certain recommendations, those recommendations ought to have more consideration than...

Private Business.: Land Drainage (Ouse) Provisional Order Bill. (15 Apr 1920)

Captain Michael Falcon: ...concerns me. The fate of that Bill will be very materially affected by the fate of this Bill to-night, and therefore, if for no other reason, I urge the House not to accept the Amendment but to give this Bill a Second Beading.

Oral Answers to Questions — India.: Punjab Disturbances. (23 Jun 1920)

Mr Rupert Gwynne: Will the right hon. Gentleman explain how it was that he was able positively to state in December, if he knew from detailed information, both from Sir Michael O'Dwyer and Miss Sherwood in June, "I said I knew no details until I saw the report in the papers." If he sent the report to the papers he must have known it before he saw it in the papers. Is that a correct way of giving information to...

Punjab Disturbances. Lord Hunter's Committee.: Army Council and General Dyer. (8 Jul 1920)

Mr Edward Carson: ...which arose after this incident. You must back your men, and it is not such a distinction, as I have already shown, that is the origin of this matter as to this error of judgment, that will ever give confidence to those faithful and patriotic citizens who have been the men who have won for you and kept your great Empire beyond the seas. The most extraordinary part of this case is as to...

Orders of the Day — Government of Ireland.: Vote of Censure Proposed. (20 Oct 1920)

Commander Hon. Joseph Kenworthy: That is one case. Now I will give a case from a tainted source—from the Sinn Fein Bulletin. Hon. Members, however, must remember that these bulletins go all over the world, and extracts from them are printed in every language. This sort of thing is good copy; it gets reprinted in the American papers—especially the Hearst Press—in certain French organs, and everywhere where we might...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ireland.: Civilians (Alleged Floggings). (26 Oct 1920)

Mr Hamar Greenwood: ...a search for an Irish Nationalist schoolmaster who was recently kidnapped, and had not yet been traced. The police interrogated a group of men who were drinking in the house, but they refused to give any information, and assumed a defiant and aggressive attitude. The police, who were well aware that these men were active members of the so-called Irish Republican Army, called upon them to...


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