Results 101–120 of 6045 for speaker:Mr William Whitelaw

Parliamentary Constituencies (England) ( 2 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I beg to move, That the draft Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 1983, which was laid before this House on 14th February, be approved. The Boundary Commission for England submitted its third periodical report on 11 February and I propose that its final recommendations should be implemented without modifications. Article 2 of the order substitutes the constituencies described in the...

Parliamentary Constituencies (England) ( 2 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: If my hon. Friends will cease telling me to answer, I will have a chance to do so. Many points can be made about both the names and the sizes of various constituencies, and about the problems connected with them. There is a considerable problem in my own area in Cumbria because a number of the constituents of my right hon. Friend the Chief Whip are passionately opposed to being placed in my...

Parliamentary Constituencies (England) ( 2 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: An agreement was made with Scotland many years ago about the minimum number of Scottish seats. So far, Parliament has not decided to change that requirement. Until Parliament changes the situation, we must accept it. There will also be a reduction in the number of borough constituencies from 304 to 279 and an increase in county constituencies from 212 to 244. This reflects significant...

Parliamentary Constituencies (England) ( 2 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I do not think that I should allow myself to be drawn too far down that road. I shall content myself with saying that the present rules do not require the Boundary Commission to consider that matter in reaching its conclusions. The combined effect of the rules and of section 2(2) of the 1958 Act is to give the commission a wide discretion. The report makes it clear that the commission...

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I am sure the right hon. Member for Leeds, South (Mr. Rees) will confirm that the last Labour Government objected to one member of the Boundary Commission because they felt that he had undertaken a political engagement on behalf of the Opposition. He was removed, understandably, and I accepted that at the time. I then had to appoint somebody in his place and in appointing Judge Newey I...

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I should like to clear up this matter. With regard to the hon. Gentleman's second point, we are following exactly the precedent followed by the Government in 1969 of which he was a supporter. It is exactly the precedent—[Interruption.] In my time, the Opposition Chief Whip did not intervene from a sedentary position, but if he wishes to do so now he is quite entitled to. It is perfectly...

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: Will the hon. Gentleman confirm that he is not alleging that either of my statements in answer to his questions were untrue? If he is, rather than make insinuations he should say that what I said was untrue. If that is what he wants to do, he had better do it.

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: That is an insinuation.

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: Let me say that I do not view the proposals with enthusiasm. Certainly my speech was not intended to convey that impression.

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The parliamentary Boundary Commissions are the subject of this afternoon's debate. Although the debate has been prompted by the recent recommendations which the four commissions have made for constituencies in the United Kingdom, those recommendations have already been or will shortly be the subject of detailed debate in the House. I do not therefore propose to discuss them on this occasion....

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: That is perfectly true and I know that my hon. Friend has had experience of that. On the other hand, after 1954 Parliament decided that too frequent boundary changes caused serious problems for constituency life. Every effort has been made to achieve a balance. Sometimes, as in my hon. Friend's case, it has not proved entirely satisfactory, but I shall return to that aspect later. The 1958...

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I am coming to that, but it impinges on what Parliament decided in the past. Parliament can, of course, decide to make changes. When Parliament decided to have more frequent changes it disliked the result of that decision very much. It therefore went back on it. Parliament must make up its mind. If it does not want more frequent changes, some of the problems to which my hon. Friend refers...

Parliamentary Boundary Commissions ( 1 Mar 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I should be very unwise—even more unwise perhaps than I normally am—if I were to reply to such a proposal. There are many arguments and Parliament must decide what it wants. It would be unwise for the Home Secretary of the day to prescribe a situation in which a great many Members would have no seat at the time of a subsequent general election. I do not wish to cast myself in that role....

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: It will be accepted on both sides of the House that we have had a valuable debate. Many different points have been raised. I wish to start by thanking all those right hon. and hon. Members who have welcomed the meetings that I have had with them, and who have stated their belief that such meetings and consultations should continue and that they do nothing but good. I hope that the hon....

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The right hon. Gentleman says "Oh", but it was hampered by the Government of which he was a member. It was only made possible by the present Government. My hon. Friend the Member for Ravensbourne (Mr. Hunt) is right. The policies of this Government, especially those on police pay, have helped to increase by 4,046 the numbers in the Metropolitan police. I must tell the right hon. Member for...

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: It is not for me to speculate. I was asked to speculate, but I shall not do so. Perhaps the right hon. Gentleman wishes to answer.

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I accept the right hon. Gentleman's explanation. I thought it right that I should both open and reply to the debate, because I am the police authority for the metropolis. My hon. and learned Friend the Minister of State would have replied far better than I, but, as I am the police authority for the metropolis, I thought it right to proceed on that basis, and so I have.

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: Of course, but I do not want to speculate too much.

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: As my hon. Friend the Member for Enfield, North (Mr. Eggar) has raised the matter, it is fair to say that it is a little mystifying that a body that has no responsibility for policing in London and has no part in paying for it in any way still seems able to decide that it is worth while spending part of the ratepayers' money on pontificating—if that is the right word—about it. That is its...

Policing in the Metropolis (28 Feb 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: To be fair, many of the arrangements have got off to a reasonably good start, and we should build upon them. I can never remember what it is in order for me to say about Committees. It is a long time since I was Chief Whip. I think that I am at least entitled to say that we shall discuss those matters in Committee. I hope at that stage to be able to assist the Committee and to address myself...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.